Games
[Event "World Cup"] [Site "Cambridge, MA USA"] [Date "2019.09.10"] [Round "1"] [White "Press, Shaun"] [Black "Ding, Liren"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B26"] [Annotator "danie"] [PlyCount "68"] [EventDate "1977.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 g6 5. d3 Bg7 6. Be3 Rb8 7. Qd2 b5 8. Nge2 b4 9. Nd1 h5 $5 (9... Nf6 10. Bh6) 10. h3 e6 {N} (10... Nf6 11. f4 Bb7 12. O-O Nd7 13. c3 Qa5 14. f5 Nce5 15. fxg6 Nxg6 16. Bg5 bxc3 17. bxc3 Ba6 18. Ne3 e6 19. Rf2 Nde5 20. Raf1 Bxd3 21. Nf5 Bf8 22. Re1 c4 23. Nf4 Qc5 24. Nd4 Rh7 25. Nxg6 Nxg6 26. e5 d5 27. Bf1 Bxf1 28. Rexf1 Qc7 29. Qc2 Bc5 30. Rxf7 Qxf7 31. Rxf7 Bxd4+ 32. cxd4 Kxf7 33. Qf2+ Ke8 34. Qc2 Nf8 35. Qa4+ Rd7 36. Bh6 Ng6 37. Qc2 Ne7 38. Qh7 Rdb7 39. g4 hxg4 40. hxg4 Rb1+ 41. Kg2 R8b2+ 42. Kg3 Rg1+ 43. Kf3 Rh1 44. g5 c3 45. g6 Rf1+ 46. Kg3 Nf5+ 47. Kg4 Rg2+ 48. Kh3 Rg3+ 49. Kh2 Rf2+ 50. Kh1 Nxh6 51. Qxh6 c2 52. g7 Kf7 {0-1 (52) Eminov,O (2295)-Sarana,A (2577) Batumi GEO 2018}) 11. O-O Nge7 12. f4 a5 13. Rb1 O-O 14. g4 hxg4 15. hxg4 f5 $1 16. exf5 (16. Nf2 fxg4 (16... Nd4 17. c3 Nxe2+ 18. Qxe2 bxc3 19. bxc3 Rxb1 20. Rxb1 Bxc3) 17. Nxg4 e5 18. f5 $1 gxf5 19. exf5 Bxf5 20. Nh6+ Bxh6 21. Bxh6) 16... exf5 17. g5 Be6 18. b3 Nd5 (18... Bd5) 19. Bf2 Nd4 20. Nxd4 cxd4 21. Re1 Bf7 22. Nb2 Ne3 $1 23. Bxe3 dxe3 24. Qxe3 Re8 25. Qf2 Rxe1+ 26. Qxe1 Qb6+ 27. Kh2 Re8 28. Qf1 d5 $1 (28... Bxb2 29. Rxb2 Qe3 30. Rb1 Qd2) 29. Na4 Qd4 30. Kh1 (30. Kg3 Re3+ 31. Kh2 Bf8) 30... Bf8 $1 31. Rc1 Bd6 (31... Qh8+ 32. Kg1 Bg7) 32. c3 bxc3 33. Nxc3 Bxf4 34. Rc2 Qh8+ 0-1 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.10"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Gan-Erdene, Sugar"] [Black "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2407"] [BlackElo "2776"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. h3 (8. f3 Be6 9. Qd2 Nbd7 10. g4 b5 11. O-O-O O-O 12. g5 b4 13. Ne2 Nh5 14. Ng3 Nf4 15. h4 a5 {Dominguez Perez,L (2763)-Vachier Lagrave,M (2778) Saint Louis 2019}) 8... Be6 9. Qf3 O-O 10. O-O-O b5 11. g4 b4 12. Nd5 Nxd5 13. exd5 Bc8 14. Bd3 Nd7 15. Rhg1 a5 16. Nd2 Qc7 {N} (16... Ba6 17. Bxa6 Rxa6 18. g5 a4 19. Qe2 Qa5 20. Kb1 Raa8 21. Ne4 Rfc8 22. Qd3 Qc7 23. h4 b3 {Oren,I (2258)-Ryzhkov,I (2356) ICCF email 2016}) 17. Bb5 $6 (17. g5) 17... Ba6 18. Bc6 Rac8 $6 (18... Bb7 19. Nc4 a4 {is good for Black.}) 19. Kb1 Bb7 20. Nc4 Bxc6 21. dxc6 Nb8 $6 ( 21... Qxc6 22. Qxc6 Rxc6 23. Nxa5 Rc7 {=}) 22. Qd5 $2 {Now everything works for Black.} (22. Nb6 $1 Qxc6 (22... Rce8 23. Nd5) 23. Qf5 {would have given White a slight advantage.}) 22... Nxc6 23. Nxd6 $6 b3 $1 24. c3 bxa2+ 25. Kxa2 ({Also bad, but perhaps not yet losing, is} 25. Ka1 Rcd8 26. Bc5 a4 (26... Rd7) ) 25... Bxd6 26. Qxd6 Nb4+ $1 {Power play.} 27. cxb4 Qc4+ 28. Ka1 axb4 29. Qd5 Qc2 $1 {The threat (of Ra8+) is stronger than the execution.} 30. Qa5 Ra8 31. Ba7 b3 {White is helpless against the threat 32...Rfc8 and 33...Rc7.} 32. Qa3 ( 32. Rc1 {allows} Qxf2 $1 33. Bxf2 Rxa5+ 34. Kb1 Rfa8) 32... Rfc8 33. Rge1 h6 34. f3 Rc7 35. Bc5 Rxa3+ 36. Bxa3 Ra7 37. Rd8+ Kh7 {Black will take on a3 next. } 0-1 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.10"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "El Gindy, Essam"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A36"] [WhiteElo "2758"] [BlackElo "2431"] [PlyCount "121"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. c4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. d3 d6 6. Qd2 Nf6 (6... Qd7 7. b3 b6 8. Bb2 Bb7 9. Nd5 e5 10. f4 Nge7 11. e4 Nxd5 12. cxd5 Nd4 13. Nf3 Nxf3+ 14. Bxf3 Qe7 {Aronian,L (2752)-Grischuk,A (2775) Stavanger 2019}) 7. b3 O-O 8. Bb2 Rb8 9. f4 {N} (9. e3 a6 10. Nge2 Qc7 11. Nf4 e6 12. h4 b5 13. h5 Ne7 14. Ne4 e5 15. Nxf6+ Bxf6 16. hxg6 fxg6 {Fahrner,K (2319)-Koscak,J (1783) Graz 2011}) 9... e5 10. Nf3 Nd4 11. O-O b6 12. Rae1 Re8 13. Ng5 Bb7 14. e3 Nf5 15. Nge4 exf4 16. Rxf4 Nh5 17. Rff1 Nh6 18. Nf2 Bxg2 19. Kxg2 Nf6 20. e4 Nhg4 21. Nd5 Ne5 22. Bxe5 dxe5 23. g4 h6 24. h4 Nh7 25. Rh1 Rb7 26. Nd1 Nf8 27. N1e3 Ne6 28. Rh2 Rd7 29. Kh1 Nf4 30. Rf1 Rd6 31. Rf3 Qd7 32. Qd1 a6 33. Qf1 b5 34. g5 h5 35. Nxf4 exf4 36. Nd5 Be5 37. Rxf4 $5 bxc4 38. bxc4 Rb8 39. Rff2 Bxh2 40. Rxh2 Rdb6 ({ Black misses a chance here:} 40... Qg4 $1) 41. Nxb6 Rxb6 42. Rd2 Qg4 43. Qe1 a5 ({And here another one:} 43... Qh3+ 44. Kg1 Rd6 45. Qf2 Rxd3 46. Rxd3 Qxd3 47. Qxc5 Qb1+ 48. Kf2 Qxe4 $1) 44. Kh2 Qf4+ 45. Kg2 a4 46. Qf2 Qe5 47. Qf3 a3 48. Rf2 Qe6 49. Qg3 Kg7 50. Kf3 Kg8 51. Kg2 Rb1 52. Qf4 Qd7 53. Kh2 Rb7 54. Qe5 Qg4 55. Qe8+ Kg7 56. Qe5+ Kh7 57. Qg3 Qd1 58. Qe5 Qg4 59. Qg3 Qd7 60. Qe5 Qg4 61. Qg3 1/2-1/2 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.10"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Mekhitarian, Krikor Sevag"] [Black "Andreikin, Dmitry"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D11"] [WhiteElo "2558"] [BlackElo "2741"] [PlyCount "111"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 a6 5. Bd3 Bg4 6. O-O Nbd7 7. Nbd2 e5 8. cxd5 cxd5 9. dxe5 Nxe5 10. Be2 Nxf3+ 11. Nxf3 Bd6 12. b3 Bxf3 13. Bxf3 Be5 14. Rb1 Qd6 15. g3 O-O 16. Bb2 Rfc8 17. Qd3 Rc7 18. Rfd1 Rd8 19. Bd4 Rdc8 20. Rd2 g6 21. Rbd1 Rc1 22. Bxe5 Qxe5 23. Bxd5 b5 24. Bf3 Kg7 25. Qd4 Qf5 26. Kg2 Qb1 27. e4 Rxd1 28. Rxd1 Qxa2 29. e5 Ng8 30. e6+ Nf6 31. Ra1 $6 ({Completely winning was} 31. Qa7 Rf8 {e.g.} 32. e7 (32. Rd8) 32... Re8 33. Rd8 Qxb3 34. Rxe8 Nxe8 35. Qd4+ (35. Qb8) 35... f6 36. Qd8 Qf7 37. Bc6) 31... Qxb3 32. Rxa6 Qc4 33. Qe5 Qc7 34. Qa1 Rf8 35. Ra7 (35. exf7 $1 Rxf7 36. Bd5) 35... Qd6 36. Ra6 Qc5 37. Rc6 Qf5 38. exf7 Rxf7 39. Qd4 Rd7 40. Qc3 Rd3 41. Rc7+ Rd7 42. Rc5 Rd3 43. Rxf5 Rxc3 44. Rxb5 Rc7 45. g4 h6 46. h4 Rc4 47. g5 Nh5 48. Bxh5 gxh5 49. Kg3 Rg4+ 50. Kh3 Rf4 51. Rb7+ Kg8 52. Rb2 Kg7 53. gxh6+ Kxh6 54. Kg3 Rg4+ 55. Kh3 Rf4 56. Kg3 1/2-1/2 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.10"] [Round "1.39"] [White "Nihal Sarin"] [Black "Cori, Jorge"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B32"] [WhiteElo "2610"] [BlackElo "2676"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "113"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 e5 5. Nb5 d6 6. c4 Be7 7. N1c3 a6 8. Na3 Be6 9. Nc2 Rc8 {Not the main line.} ({The original idea of Sveshnikov to avoid the move Ng8-f6 was to trade the dark-squared bishops with} 9... Bg5 10. Be2 Bxc1 11. Rxc1 Nf6 12. O-O O-O 13. Qd2 Qb6 14. Rfd1 Rfd8 {as in Carlsen,M (2862) -Hou,Y (2673) Wijk aan Zee 2015}) ({Although Black can always switch back to Sveshnikov-like lines with} 9... Nf6 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O Rc8 {as in Volokitin, A (2649) -Moiseenko,A (2657) Rivne 2016 (see below.)}) 10. Be2 Na5 {Cori wants to generate queenside play before he castles, but this might be a risky strategy here.} ({Instead} 10... Nf6 {is still possible and was seen in some games of the Kalashnikov main specialist Alexander Moiseenko:} 11. Be3 O-O 12. O-O Nb8 13. Na3 ({Or} 13. b3 b5 14. Nb4 bxc4 15. Bxc4 Bxc4 16. bxc4 Rxc4 17. Qb3 Rc8 18. Nbd5 Nxd5 19. Nxd5 Bg5 20. Rac1 Rxc1 21. Rxc1 Nd7 22. Rc6 {1/2-1/2 (22) Volokitin,A (2649)-Moiseenko,A (2657) Rivne 2016}) 13... Nc6 14. Rc1 h6 { with playable position, Yu,Y (2750)-Moiseenko,A (2667) China 2017}) 11. b3 b5 12. Ne3 bxc4 13. Ned5 $1 {N Only energetic play can refute Black's idea. This move is a novelty and reveals some problems behind Cori's set up.} ({A predecessor saw Black doing more than fine after:} 13. bxc4 Nxc4 14. Nxc4 Bxc4 15. O-O Nf6 16. Be3 Qa5 17. Bd2 Qa3 18. Bxc4 Rxc4 19. Qf3 Qc5 20. Rac1 O-O { with a solid extra pawn for the second player, Tobon,S (1800)-Medvedovski,M (2115) Frankfurt 2018}) 13... Nf6 ({It transpires that the pawn is taboo:} 13... cxb3 14. axb3 Nf6 (14... Ra8 15. Be3 $1) 15. Bxa6 {leads Black to a horrible position after} Rb8 16. Bb5+ Bd7 17. Bxd7+ ({Not as accurate is} 17. Nxf6+ Bxf6 18. Bxd7+ Qxd7 $1 19. Rxa5 Qc7) 17... Nxd7 18. Nxe7 {And in order to avoid the loss of the knight Black has to give up his castling right:} Kxe7 {which is a huge advantage for White.}) ({The move} 13... Bxd5 {would most likely transpose into the game after} 14. Nxd5 Nf6 15. Be3 Nxd5 ({as} 15... Rb8 16. bxc4 Nxe4 17. Qa4+ Kf8 18. O-O {once again leaves the black king badly misplaced.})) 14. Be3 {Be3-b6 is a huge threat and Black needs to initiate some trades.} Bxd5 15. Nxd5 Nxd5 16. Qxd5 O-O ({Once again there is no time to snatch the pawn:} 16... cxb3 $2 17. axb3 Nc6 18. Bxa6 Rc7 19. Bb6) 17. O-O cxb3 18. Bxa6 Rc3 ({Perhaps a better try was} 18... b2 19. Rab1 ({Also better for White is} 19. Bxc8 bxa1=Q 20. Rxa1 Qxc8 21. Qxa5 Qb7) 19... Rc6 20. Bd3 h6 21. Rxb2 Bg5 {White is again better, but Black would at least manage to get rid of one of the annoying bishops.}) 19. Rfb1 $1 {Wonderfully played! Nihal spots that the c3 rook is in danger.} ({White has nothing after} 19. axb3 Nxb3 20. Rab1 Nc5) 19... Nc6 ({The point behind White's play is revealed by the line} 19... bxa2 20. Qxa2 $1 Nc6 (20... Rxe3 {is the best chance but he does not have enough to survive here either after} 21. fxe3 Nc6) 21. Bb6 Qd7 22. Qd2 { The rook is trapped!}) 20. Rxb3 {White wants to keep a passer along the a-file as then his bishop may support it all the way up to the promotional square.} ({ However:} 20. axb3 Nd4 21. Bxd4 exd4 22. Bc4 {might have been more accurate, keeping the black rook locked.}) 20... Rxb3 21. Qxb3 Nd4 {Cori decided to defend a gloomy position with opposite-colored bishops on the board.} ({But:} 21... Bg5 22. Bxg5 Qxg5 23. a4 Nd4 {might have been the better practical chance. The queen and the knight pair cannot be underestimated, especially in the attack.}) 22. Bxd4 exd4 23. Bc4 {Black is in trouble. His bishop is significantly underperforming in comparison to its counterpart and the a-passer is a monster.} Qa5 24. g3 Bg5 25. Kg2 g6 26. Bd5 Qc3 ({Or} 26... Qa7 27. Rb1) 27. Rd1 Kg7 ({Black deviates from the endgame. After:} 27... Qxb3 28. axb3 (28. Bxb3 {is also good of course.}) 28... Bf6 29. Kf3 {Followed by Kf3-e2-d3 White will release his rook, which in its turn will land on the seventh rank. This will finally give a free passage to the queenside-passer.}) 28. Rd3 Qc5 29. a4 Bd8 30. Qb2 Bb6 31. Rb3 {For a moment White hesitates.} (31. h4 {at once was better than in the game.}) 31... Ba5 32. Rd3 Bb6 ({Missing a chance to activate his pieces to the maximum with} 32... Rc8 33. Qxd4+ Qxd4 34. Rxd4 Rc2 {The defender often saves himself with such sacrifices.}) 33. h4 $1 { Finally Nihal finds the right plan. The major weakness in the position is the black king and the h-pawn puts it in great danger.} Rc8 ({The blockade cannot succeed:} 33... h5 34. Rb3 Ba5 35. Qe2 {followed by g3-g4 will nevertheless lead to decisive attack for White.}) 34. Qe2 Ba7 ({Nothing changes} 34... Qa5 35. Qf3 Qa7 36. h5) 35. h5 Qc1 ({Here is a line which reveals why the h-pawn matters in the attack:} 35... Rf8 36. Rb3 Rb8 37. Qg4 $1 Rxb3 38. h6+ Kxh6 39. Qf4+ Kg7 40. Qxf7+ Kh6 41. Qf8+ {with mate to follow.}) 36. Qg4 Rc7 37. Rf3 ({ Even stronger was} 37. Qh4 {To prevent the defensive idea which happened in the game. Then} Bb6 38. Rf3 Ba7 ({Here} 38... d3 {is a move too late:} 39. h6+ Qxh6 40. Qf6+ {with mate.}) 39. h6+ Qxh6 40. Qf6+ {and mate is unavoidable.}) 37... d3 $1 {Cori finds the only way to defend against the immediate mate.} 38. Qh4 Bd4 39. Rxd3 {Safe play.} ({Faster was} 39. Bxf7 $1 {when the d-passer can do White no harm and he is winning after both} Rxf7 ({or} 39... d2 40. h6+ Kf8 41. Qd8#) 40. h6+ Qxh6 41. Rxf7+) 39... g5 {This weakens the king.} ({However: } 39... Bf6 40. Qh3 {does not stop the attack.}) 40. h6+ Kf8 ({Or} 40... Kg6 41. Qh3 {when Black should soon be mated.}) 41. Qh5 {Nihal is almost there with Rd3-f3 as a decisive threat. Cori finds one last chance:} Bxf2 $1 42. Rf3 $1 {...which is nicely parried by White. Initiative is everything in the opposite-bishop attacks.} ({The obvious capture} 42. Kxf2 Rc2+ 43. Kf3 Qf1+ 44. Kg4 {would have deprived White of deserved win after} Rf2 $1 {In order to avoid the Qf1-e2 mating threat he should settle for a draw with} 45. Rd2 $1 Rxd2 46. Qxg5 Qe2+ 47. Kh4 Qh2+) 42... Qg1+ 43. Kh3 Qh1+ 44. Kg4 Qxh5+ 45. Kxh5 Bd4 ({A bit more stubborn was} 45... Be1 46. Kxg5 Bd2+ 47. Kh5 Re7 {although White should also win here.}) 46. a5 {Now the pawn moves and it is over in a few moves.} Ra7 47. a6 $1 f6 ({Or} 47... Rxa6 48. Rxf7+ Ke8 49. Rxh7) 48. Ra3 ( 48. Bb7 {at once would also suffice.}) 48... Ke7 49. Kg4 Kd8 50. Bb7 {The rook is out of the game. Nihal calmly prepares the final blow.} Bc5 51. Rb3 Ke7 52. Kf5 Bd4 53. g4 Kd7 54. Bd5 $1 {The time has come.} Rxa6 55. Rb7+ Kc8 56. Rxh7 Ra1 57. Rf7 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.10"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Huschenbeth, Niclas"] [Black "Naiditsch, Arkadij"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C19"] [WhiteElo "2620"] [BlackElo "2643"] [PlyCount "77"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 Ne7 7. Qg4 cxd4 8. Qxg7 Rg8 9. Qxh7 Qc7 10. Qd3 (10. Ne2 Nbc6 11. h4 Bd7 12. f4 dxc3 13. h5 O-O-O 14. Qd3 d4 15. h6 Rg6 16. h7 Rh8 {Kulaots,K (2560)-Radjabov,T (2759) Dortmund 2019}) 10... Qxe5+ 11. Ne2 dxc3 12. Qxc3 Nbc6 13. Qxe5 Nxe5 14. Ng3 f6 15. Bb2 Kf7 16. Nh5 Nd7 17. O-O-O b6 {N} (17... a6 18. Be2 e5 19. Rhg1 b5 20. f4 Bb7 21. g4 d4 22. Rdf1 Ke6 23. g5 Be4 {Van Foreest,J (2626)-Karthik,V (2462) Zuerich 2019}) 18. Rg1 Bb7 19. g4 Rh8 20. f4 Rh6 21. Be2 Rah8 $6 22. Nxf6 $1 Nxf6 23. g5 Rxh2 24. gxf6 (24. Bxf6) 24... Nf5 25. Bd3 R8h7 26. Bxf5 exf5 27. Bd4 Ba6 28. Rg7+ (28. Rg5) 28... Rxg7 29. fxg7 Be2 30. Rg1 Bg4 31. Re1 Be2 32. Rg1 Bg4 33. Re1 Be2 34. a4 Kg8 35. Kb2 a5 36. Ka1 Kf7 37. Rb1 Rh6 38. Rg1 Kg8 ( 38... Bg4 39. Re1) 39. Rg3 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.12"] [Round "1.2"] [White "Christiansen, Johan-Sebastian"] [Black "Wojtaszek, Radoslaw"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B94"] [WhiteElo "2558"] [BlackElo "2739"] [PlyCount "85"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 Nbd7 7. Qe2 (7. Bc4 Qb6 8. Bb3 e6 9. Qd2 Be7 10. O-O-O Nc5 11. f3 Bd7 12. g4 Qc7 13. a3 b5 14. Ba2 Qb7 {Cheparinov,I (2666)-Saric,I (2681) Patras 2019}) 7... h6 8. Bh4 g6 9. f4 e5 10. fxe5 dxe5 11. O-O-O Qc7 12. Nb3 b5 13. Rxd7 $5 ({In 2014 Parimarjan Negi recommended} 13. Nd5 {in his Grandmaster Repertoire series for Quality Chess. The text move is known from tournament practice since 2017.} Ng4) 13... Nxd7 14. Nd5 Qb8 (14... Qd6 15. Na5 Ra7 (15... f6 $5 16. Qf3 Be7 {Nikolovski,N (2380)-Grigoryan,K (2542) Novi Sad SRB 2018}) 16. Qf2 Rc7 17. Be2 Qc5 18. Bg4 g5 19. Rf1 Qxf2 20. Nxc7+ Kd8 21. Bxf2 Kxc7 22. Bg3 f6 23. Bxd7 Kxd7 24. Rxf6 { Fawzy,A (2431)-Cheparinov,I (2715) Batumi GEO 2018}) 15. Na5 (15. Bf6 Nxf6 16. Nxf6+ Ke7 17. Nd5+ Ke8 18. Nf6+ Ke7 19. Nd5+ Ke8 20. Nf6+ {Blomqvist,E (2488) -Wei Yi (2733) Astana KAZ 2019}) 15... Bc5 (15... Bb7 16. Nf6+ (16. Qd2 Bxd5 17. Qxd5 Bd6 18. Be2 O-O 19. Nc6 Nb6 20. Nxb8 Nxd5 21. Nd7 Nf4 {Kokarev,D (2620)-Sorokin,A (2469) Sochi RUS 2017}) 16... Nxf6 17. Bxf6 Qc7 18. Nxb7 Rg8 19. a4 bxa4 20. Qc4 Qxb7 21. Qxa4+ Qd7 {Gruenfeld,Y (2421)-Steinberg,N (2532) Ma'alot-Tarshiha ISR 2018}) 16. Qd2 g5 {N} (16... Bb7 17. Be2 Bd4 18. Nxb7 Qxb7 19. c3 Bc5 20. Bg4 Nb6 21. Bf6 Nc4 22. Qe2 O-O {O'Gorman,T (2280)-Nakar,E (2462) Helsingor 2018}) 17. Bg3 Qd6 18. Be2 O-O 19. Rf1 f6 20. h4 Kg7 21. hxg5 fxg5 22. Rxf8 Nxf8 23. b4 Ba7 24. Qc3 Ng6 25. Nc6 Bb8 26. Nxe5 Nxe5 27. Qxc8 Ra7 28. Bf2 Rf7 29. Bc5 Rf8 30. Qb7+ Rf7 31. Qc8 Rf8 32. Qh3 $1 {Avoiding the draw that was enough to reach round two.} Qc6 33. Bxf8+ Kxf8 34. Kb1 Kg7 35. Bd3 Ba7 36. Qf5 Bd4 37. a3 Qd6 38. Be2 Qc6 39. Bd3 Qd6 40. Be2 Qc6 41. Bh5 Qd6 42. Qc8 Nc4 43. Nc7 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.12"] [Round "1.2"] [White "Maghsoodloo, Parham"] [Black "Chigaev, Maksim"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B06"] [WhiteElo "2664"] [BlackElo "2644"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. d4 g6 2. e4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. Nf3 e6 5. Be2 Nd7 6. Bf4 Ne7 7. Qd2 h6 8. h4 b6 9. O-O Bb7 10. Rad1 a6 11. Rfe1 Qb8 12. a4 Qa7 13. e5 d5 14. Bf1 Qb8 15. Ne2 c5 16. c3 c4 17. Ng3 Qc7 18. Nh2 Nf5 19. Nxf5 gxf5 20. Be2 O-O-O 21. Nf1 Rdg8 22. Ng3 Qd8 23. b3 cxb3 24. c4 dxc4 25. Bxc4 Kb8 26. d5 Nc5 27. Qe3 Qxh4 28. a5 Bf8 29. Nxf5 $1 Qg4 (29... exf5 30. e6+ Ka8 31. exf7 Rg6 32. Qe8+) 30. Ng3 b5 ( 30... h5 $5 31. axb6 h4 32. dxe6 fxe6 33. Rd8+ Bc8 34. b7 $1 Kxb7 (34... Nxb7 35. Rxc8+ $1 Kxc8 36. Bxa6) 35. Be2 Qg7 36. Bf3+ Kb8 37. Nf5 $1 Qc7 38. Nd4) 31. Be2 Qh4 32. d6 Na4 33. Rc1 Rg4 34. Rc7 Rxf4 35. Rec1 Rc4 36. R1xc4 bxc4 37. Bf3 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.11"] [Round "2.19"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Albornoz Cabrera, Carlos Daniel"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2729"] [BlackElo "2581"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "41"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. O-O Bd7 5. Re1 Nf6 6. c3 a6 7. Bf1 Bg4 8. d4 { A topical, sharp line.} Bxf3 ({The main line remains} 8... cxd4 9. cxd4 { when Black has two principally different tries to fight for the center:} d5 { Black received a recent blow in the variation at the top-level game played in July:} ({Or} 9... e5 10. d5 Nd4 {which led to favorable Ruy Lopez type of position for White in the following game:} 11. Be3 Nxf3+ 12. gxf3 Bd7 13. Nd2 b5 14. a4 Be7 15. axb5 axb5 16. Rxa8 (16. Qb3 $5) 16... Qxa8 17. Nb3 {with some advantage for White in Anand,V (2776)-Gharamian,T (2626) Bastia 2016}) ( 9... Bxf3 {would transpose into the game.}) 10. exd5 Nxd5 11. Nc3 e6 12. h3 Bh5 13. g4 Bg6 14. Nxd5 Qxd5 15. Bg2 O-O-O (15... Bb4 $5 {Firouzja.}) 16. Ne5 Qxd4 17. Qf3 {and White had a dangerous attack which he duly converted, Giri,A (2779) -Mamedyarov,S (2774) Zagreb 2019}) 9. gxf3 cxd4 10. cxd4 d5 11. e5 (11. Nc3 e6 12. Bg5 Be7 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. exd5 Nxd4 15. Re4 Nf5 {was pointed out to Svidler after the game as theory that he wasn't aware of.}) 11... Nh5 {If Black gets the tempo to block the position he will even be better, but there is no time for that.} 12. e6 $1 g6 13. Nc3 f5 $6 {"A very large present." - Svidler.} ({Svidler pointed out that} 13... Bg7 14. exf7+ Kxf7 15. Bh3 Nxd4 16. Be3 Nf5 17. Nxd5 e6 {was quite playable for Black.}) (13... Ng7 14. Bh3 Nxe6 15. Rxe6 $1 fxe6 16. Bxe6 Bg7 17. Be3 Qd6 18. Nxd5 {is another line from Svidler.}) 14. Qb3 Nxd4 {N Albornoz might have mixed something in his memory.} ({A predecessor saw:} 14... Bg7 15. Qxb7 Nxd4 {when Svidler had a choice to improve on that played game later:} 16. Nxd5 ({Or at once with} 16. Rd1 $5) 16... Rb8 {Now instead of the blunder} 17. Qa7 $4 ({White could have headed instead for a small but stable advantage in the endgame after:} 17. Qd7+ Qxd7 18. exd7+ Kxd7 19. Rxe7+ Kd6 20. Be3 Kxd5 21. Rd1) 17... Nxf3+ 18. Kh1 Nxe1 { when Black was winning, Kristjansson,S (2478)-Koop,T (2416) Reykjavik 2016}) 15. Qxb7 Rb8 (15... Bg7 16. Rd1 O-O {Svidler} 17. Nxd5) 16. Qxa6 Nxf3+ 17. Kh1 Qc7 $2 {With the bishop on f8 blocking the king this loses!} ({Obviously, there is no time to pick up the rook:} 17... Nxe1 18. Qc6+ Qd7 19. Qxd7#) ({ However, it is also a bit too late for:} 17... Bg7 18. Qc6+ Kf8 19. Rd1 Nd4 20. Qxd5 Qxd5+ 21. Nxd5 {When Black has to settle for a gloomy endgame with} Nxe6 ( {As} 21... Nc2 22. Rb1 Na3 {does not force repetition due to the beautiful shot } 23. Nb6 $1 Nxb1 24. Nd7+ Ke8 25. Nxb8 {and White wins.}) 22. a4 {The bishop pair and the outside passers make Black's defensive task close to impossible. But this was Black's best choice.}) 18. Qa4+ $1 {Now the king has to stay in the center.} ({Avoiding} 18. Bb5+ Kd8 19. Kg2 Nxe1+ 20. Kf1) ({However, the moves could have been transposed:} 18. Bf4 $1) ({Svidler looked at the beautiful} 18. Re5 {when the only move} Bg7 $1 {is winning for Black.}) 18... Kd8 19. Bf4 $1 {whereas White can save-guard his own royalty.} Nxf4 (19... Qxf4 20. Qd7#) 20. Nb5 {Black's coordination is lost and as long as he is not delivering, he is receiving mate.} Qb6 ({Or:} 20... Rxb5 21. Bxb5 Nxe1 22. Bd7 $1 {with unstoppable mate.}) (20... Qb7 21. Rac1 (21. Na7 $1)) 21. Nd4 $1 { One last pretty move before the curtains fall.} (21. Nd4 {The finish could have been:} Qc7 ({Or:} 21... Qb7 22. Nc6+ Kc7 23. Qxf4+ Kxc6 24. Rac1+ Kb6 25. Qb4+ Ka7 26. Qa5+ Qa6 27. Qxa6#) ({Nothing changes:} 21... Rb7 22. Nc6+ Kc7 23. Qxf4+ Kxc6 24. Rac1+) 22. Nc6+ Kc8 {Now the most convincing is the cool:} 23. Rac1 ({Although} 23. Ba6+ Rb7 24. Bxb7+ Qxb7 25. Na5 {would also do.})) 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.12"] [Round "4.16"] [White "Nabaty, Tamir"] [Black "Sethuraman, S.P..."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A48"] [WhiteElo "2658"] [BlackElo "2624"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. d4 ({Another move order that may transpose to the same line runs:} 1. e4 c5 2. c3 d5 3. d3 g6 4. Nd2 Bg7 5. Ngf3 Nc6 6. Be2 Nf6 7. O-O dxe4 8. dxe4 O-O 9. Qc2 b6 10. Nc4 Qc7 {1/2 Sedlak,N (2568)-Miladinovic,I (2604) Mataruska Banja 2008}) 1... Nf6 2. Nf3 d6 3. Nbd2 g6 4. e4 Bg7 5. c3 {Nabaty needs a draw and does not mind a solid central setup.} O-O 6. a4 c5 7. dxc5 dxc5 8. Be2 Nc6 9. O-O Qc7 10. Qc2 b6 11. Nc4 Bb7 12. Bg5 Rad8 13. Rfd1 h6 14. Bh4 Nh5 { Everything is very logical. The only active square for the bishop is g5, but it can be easily traded there. True, Black needs to weaken himself.} 15. Ne3 g5 16. Nd5 Qc8 {N} ({Curiously, this all had been seen before:} 16... Qb8 17. Bxg5 hxg5 18. Nxg5 Qe5 19. h4 Nf4 20. Bc4 e6 21. g3 {with a mess, Sirotine,K (2388) -Iskusnyh,S (2520) St Petersburg 2006}) 17. Bg3 Nxg3 (17... e6 18. Ne3 { would most likely transpose as White threatens to save the bishop.}) 18. hxg3 e6 19. Ne3 Ne7 {Sethuraman skilfully maneuvers with his pieces.} 20. Rxd8 { Nabaty feels that his opponent makes progress and decides to trade the potentially dangerous black rooks.} ({Maybe White should have tried the more solid} 20. Nd2 Qc7 21. a5 {in order to get rid of this potential weakness.}) 20... Rxd8 21. Rd1 Rxd1+ 22. Bxd1 Qc6 {The most obvious move is inaccuracy.} ({ So far Black has played quite well and could have started grinding his opponent with} 22... Bc6 $1 23. Nd2 Ng6 {Next the knight will get to e5 and later c5-c4 will be in the cards. The two bishops can become a weapon in the future.}) 23. Qd3 $1 {The tactical point. Nabaty had probably seen this before the trade of the rooks.} ({Otherwise Black is enjoying himself after} 23. Nd2 Ng6) 23... Qxe4 ({It was not too late to switch to "grinding mode" with} 23... Qc7 24. Bc2 Ng6 {when Black is somewhat better, but would that be enough for the point?}) 24. Qd8+ {Now White achieves maximum activity:} Bf8 25. Bc2 Qc6 26. Ng4 Kg7 27. Nf6 ({Objectively better was:} 27. Nxh6 {As after} f5 ({ White is slightly better after} 27... f6 28. Ng4) 28. g4 $1 {The knight not only is not trapped, but will have strong influence in the attack.}) 27... Qc8 28. Nh5+ Kh8 {Sethuraman needs to risk.} ({After} 28... Kg8 29. Nf6+ Kh8 30. Qd3 ({White can also venture into an endgame:} 30. Ne5 $6 Qxd8 31. Nxf7+ Kg7 32. Nxd8 Kxf6 33. Nxb7 Nc6 {but this is really risky with his knight stuck on b7.}) 30... Nf5 31. g4 c4 32. Qe2 {White has dangerous threats and easier play as well, although the computer claims equality.}) 29. Ne5 f5 {Probably a mistake.} ({But the problem is how to play and win the position after} 29... Qxd8 30. Nxf7+ Kg8 31. Nxd8 Bd5 32. Nf6+ Kh8) 30. Qd6 ({There was a pleasant alternative:} 30. Ng6+ Nxg6 31. Qf6+ Kh7 32. Qf7+ Kh8 33. Nf6 Bg7 34. Qxg6 Bxf6 35. Qxf6+ {with an attack.}) 30... Bd5 (30... c4 31. g4 $1 {does not stop the attack.}) 31. c4 Bc6 ({Black would lose a piece in the line:} 31... Nc6 32. Ng6+ Kg8 33. Nxf8 Qxf8 34. Qxf8+ Kxf8 35. cxd5) 32. Nf7+ Kh7 ({Black should not survive after} 32... Kg8 33. Nd8 {either.}) 33. Nd8 Kg6 {Finally, the king will trap the knight, but it will be surrounded by pieces itself:} 34. Nxe6 Kxh5 35. Ng7+ $1 Bxg7 36. g4+ $1 fxg4 ({Or} 36... Kxg4 37. Bd1+ Kh4 38. Qg3#) 37. Qh2# 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.13"] [Round "10.14"] [White "Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E06"] [WhiteElo "2656"] [BlackElo "2745"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "59"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. Nf3 (1. c4 e6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. Nf3 Be7 5. d4 O-O {1-0 (49) Meier,G (2628)-Nisipeanu,L (2672) Dortmund 2018}) 1... Nf6 2. d4 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. g3 O-O 6. Bg2 dxc4 7. Ne5 Qd6 {"I did not expect this especially since I have played it and come to the conclusion it is kind of dubious." (Nisipeanu)} ({Nakamura has experience in this line as White:} 7... c5 8. dxc5 Qxd1+ 9. Nxd1 Bxc5 10. O-O Nd5 11. Ne3 Nc6 12. N3xc4 Nxe5 13. Nxe5 Bd4 14. Nd3 {1/2 Nakamura, H (2761)-Radjabov,T (2759) Moscow 2019. But this game can hardly be called a fight.}) ({Nisipeanu believes he is slightly better after} 7... Nc6 8. Bxc6) 8. O-O {Postponing the capture of the pawn for the time being.} (8. Nxc4 Qa6 { was how Black should play according to the German player as Black then quickly solves the problem of his most problematic pieces (the queen and the light-squared bishop) after a further ...Rf8-d8 and ...Bc8-d7-c6.}) 8... Qa6 9. a4 Nc6 ({Nisipeanu also has experience in the line with reversed colors. Last year he tried the move:} 9... Rd8 {in the featured position against Meier. His countryman reacted well:} 10. Nb5 Ne8 11. Qc2 Nc6 12. Qxc4 Nxd4 13. Be3 Nf5 14. Bc5 Bxc5 15. Qxc5 Qb6 16. Qxb6 axb6 17. Rfd1 {and White went on to win an instructive game, Meier,G (2628)-Nisipeanu,L (2672) Dortmund 2018}) 10. Nb5 ({ With the pawn on a4 the capure on c6 makes less sense:} 10. Nxc6 bxc6 {"A tripled pawn opens two files!" (Yermo)}) 10... Nxe5 11. dxe5 ({White cannot bring his knight out in case of:} 11. Nxc7 $2 Qa5 12. Nxa8 Nc6) 11... Rd8 12. exf6 $1 {N "I could not really remember if this sacrifice was good or not." (Nisipeanu) The intuitive sacrifices remain one of the last human weapons against the power of the machines.} ({Instead a predecessor saw a quick draw after} 12. Qc2 Nd5 13. Qxc4 c6 14. Nd6 Qxc4 15. Nxc4 b6 16. Bd2 Ba6 17. Rfc1 { 1/2 Efimenko,Z (2647)-Kravtsiv,M (2623) Lvov 2015}) 12... Rxd1 13. Rxd1 ({ White rejected} 13. fxe7 {due to} Rxf1+ 14. Kxf1 ({However} 14. Bxf1 {provides compensation for the material as well, for example:} Bd7 ({Against} 14... Qc6 { best seems the preliminary} 15. Bg2 ({rather than} 15. Nxc7 Bd7 16. Nxa8 Qc8) 15... Qd7 {Then} 16. Nxc7 Qxe7 17. Nxa8 {when Black cannot pick up the knight} b6 18. a5) 15. Nxc7 Qd6 16. Nxa8 {However White did not like} Qxe7 17. Nc7 a6) 14... Bd7 $1 15. Nxc7 Qd6 {With mating threat.} 16. Bf4 e5 {"White is just busted." (Nisipeanu)}) 13... Bd6 {The only move.} (13... Bxf6 $2 14. Nxc7) 14. Bf4 e5 {This move, just like the others before, was practically blitzed. Nevertheless, it seems it's Black's major mistake. The speed with which Nakamura played though made White chose his next move from purely practically reasons.} ({The computer suggests instead the highly sophisticated:} 14... c3 15. bxc3 e5 16. Bxe5 Qa5 17. Bxd6 cxd6 18. fxg7 {but this seems like a fun position to play as White.}) ({More natural however was:} 14... Qa5 $1 { For example:} 15. Nxd6 ({There is also the repetition} 15. Bd2 Qa6 16. Bf4 { in case that White does not mind sharing the point.}) 15... cxd6 16. Rxd6 gxf6 17. Bh6 ({Not that good is} 17. Rad1 Kg7 $1 {when the king is secure.}) 17... e5 18. Rad1 {and whenever the bishop goes, White captures on b7:} Be6 (18... Bf5 19. Bxb7) 19. Bxb7 {The position remains unbalanced, but since the black king is eternally weak Nisipeanu repeated multiple times he "may never lose it. "}) 15. Nxd6 ({White did not like the line:} 15. Bxe5 $1 Bh3 16. Bxd6 Bxg2 17. Nxc7 Qc6 18. Nxa8 Bh3 19. f3 {that much as he felt his king is in danger. However, if he just keeps his knight to control the diagonal he should be much better, say:} gxf6 20. a5 $1 {and I do not see any danger for him, just extra material for White.} ({Rather than} 20. Nc7 $2 Qb6+ 21. Kh1 Qf2 {(Nisipeanu) which indeed wins for Black after} 22. Rg1 c3 $3 (22... Qxe2 23. Ra3 $1) 23. bxc3 Qxe2 {with huge material losses for White.})) 15... cxd6 {The first lengthy thought by Nakamura, in an obviouly tough position.} ({Nisipeanu believed that the best defense was:} 15... exf4 $5 16. Ne8 Qb6 {when White has a lot of choice:} ({After} 16... Qa5 17. Rd8 gxf6 {White simply brings more and more pieces into the attack:} 18. Rad1) 17. Rd8 ({White can also win material after:} 17. a5 Qxb2 18. Nxc7 (18. a6 $5) 18... gxf6 19. Nxa8 {and this should be much better for him, although there are still chances after} c3) 17... gxf6 18. Rad1 ({One point behind the move Qa6-b6 is revealed in the line } 18. Nxc7+ Kg7 19. Nxa8 Qxd8) 18... Qxb2 19. Nxc7+ Kg7 20. Nxa8 {White should be better, but there is still much play going.}) 16. Bxe5 $1 {"I thought I am much better here." (Nisipeanu)} Qa5 ({Not} 16... Bh3 17. Rxd6 Qa5 18. Rd5 $1 { (Nisipeanu)} ({Rather than} 18. Bc3 Qc5)) 17. Rxd6 {In comparison to the line above White did not win material, but has all his pieces securely placed. He's dominating. Nakamura needs to sacrifice some pawns to bring the reserves out, but this does not help him.} Bg4 ({Nothing changes} 17... Be6 18. Rad1) 18. Bc3 Qc7 19. Rad1 g6 ({If} 19... Bxe2 20. Rd7 {and the rooks dominate on the seventh rank.}) 20. Bxb7 Rf8 21. Bf3 Bxf3 (21... Bf5 22. Rc6 {is equally hopeless.}) 22. exf3 {White has it all: a more secure king, more active pieces and even a material advantage.} h5 ({Or} 22... Re8 23. Kg2) 23. Kg2 Re8 24. h4 Qc8 25. a5 {Next Nisipeanu improves everything he can and penetrates on the back ranks.} a6 26. Rd7 Qa8 27. R1d6 Rc8 28. Bd4 c3 29. bxc3 Re8 30. Bb6 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.13"] [Round "2.1"] [White "Nihal Sarin"] [Black "Safarli, Eltaj"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C94"] [WhiteElo "2610"] [BlackElo "2593"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Nc6 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 3. Bb5 {[%emt 0:00:28]} a6 {71} 4. Ba4 {[%emt 0:00:20]} Nf6 { [%emt 0:00:05]} 5. O-O {[%emt 0:00:48]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 6. Re1 {[%emt 0: 00:31]} b5 {76} 7. Bb3 {[%emt 0:00:56]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 8. c3 {[%emt 0:00: 41]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:07]} 9. h3 {95} Nb8 {46 The Breyer!} 10. d4 {295} Nbd7 { 187} 11. Nbd2 {380} Bb7 {195} 12. Bc2 {140} Re8 {[%emt 0:00:42]} 13. Nf1 { [%emt 0:00:41]} Bf8 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 14. Ng3 {[%emt 0:00:11]} g6 {[%emt 0:00: 07]} 15. a4 {494} (15. b3) (15. Rb1 c5 16. d5 c4 17. b4 cxb3 18. axb3) 15... Bg7 {[%emt 0:00:11]} (15... c5 {is by far the main move here.} 16. d5 c4 { An important game in this line was between MVL and Bassem Amin who is a big expert in the Breyer.} 17. Bg5 Nc5 18. Nh2 h6 19. Be3 h5 20. Qf3 Nh7 21. Qe2 Qc7 22. Ngf1 Rab8 23. Nd2 Bc8 24. axb5 axb5 25. f4 exf4 26. Bxf4 Nf6 27. Qf1 Nfd7 28. Nhf3 Bg7 29. Qf2 Rb6 30. Be3 Ra6 31. Rxa6 Bxa6 32. Bd4 Bf8 33. Rf1 Bh6 34. g4 hxg4 35. Qh4 gxf3 36. Qxh6 Ne5 37. Nxf3 Ncd7 38. Ng5 Nf8 39. Nxf7 Qxf7 40. Rxf7 Kxf7 41. Bd1 Re7 42. Bg4 {1-0 (42) Vachier Lagrave,M (2780)-Amin,B (2704) Brest 2019}) 16. Bd3 {390} c6 {[%emt 0:00:50]} (16... d5 $5 {was seen in Anand vs Santos Latasa and Black should be holding his own here.} 17. Bg5 ( 17. dxe5 dxe4 18. exf6 Nxf6 $11) (17. exd5 exd4 18. Rxe8+ Qxe8 19. cxd4 bxa4 $11) 17... b4 $5 {is a line which should be explored in greater depth.}) 17. Bg5 {719} h6 {146} (17... Nf8 18. Qd2 Ne6 19. Be3 Nd7 {is another way to play this position, but somehow it looks a bit passive.}) 18. Be3 {415} Qc7 {137} 19. Qd2 {381} Kh7 {34 Until now we have 23 games that have been played! It looks pretty normal.} 20. b4 $5 {56 Nihal has taken unusually high amount of time for his moves until now but the last one he played pretty quickly. It is quite possible that he is still within his preparation! White is better here.} Nb6 {323} (20... exd4 21. cxd4 $16) (20... d5 21. dxe5 Nxe4 22. Bxe4 dxe4 23. Nxe4 Nxe5 24. Nxe5 Bxe5 25. Bd4 $16) 21. dxe5 {337 By taking on e5 Nihal starts a serious of moves that are committal but give him a lot of space in the position. Usually White doesn't like to clarify with dxe5 because he is essentially exchanging his d4 pawn for the one on d6. But in this case Nihal has a concrete idea in his mind.} (21. a5 exd4 (21... Nc4) 22. cxd4 Nc4 23. Bxc4 bxc4 24. Bf4 Qd7 25. Rac1 d5 26. Ne5 $16 {Even here it seems as if White's position is clearly preferable.}) 21... dxe5 22. a5 $1 Nbd7 {[%emt 0: 00:58]} 23. c4 $1 {174 With a series of powerful moves Nihal has taken over the iniative.} Rad8 {148} (23... bxc4 24. Bxc4 Re7 25. Qa2) 24. Qa2 $1 {200} Kg8 {218} (24... Qd6 25. Bc2 bxc4 26. Qxc4 Qe6 27. Qxe6 Rxe6 28. Red1 $16) 25. Bc2 $1 $18 {503 An excellent move by Nihal. He is now going to plae his bishop on b3 and put more pressure on the f7 point. White is not just better here, but with accurate play even close to winning!} Qd6 {1958 Black has to make this uncomfortable move because he cannot move his knight from d7. It allows Bb6.} 26. Bb3 {135} Qe7 {[%emt 0:00:53]} 27. Rad1 {366} (27. Nh4) 27... Rc8 { 134} 28. Nh4 {81} Kf8 {522} 29. c5 {181 Packing the Black pieces completely!} Nb8 {106} 30. Rd6 {202 This is also very strong. Next up is a knight sacrifice on the f5 square!} Red8 {543} 31. Ngf5 {Bamm!} gxf5 32. Nxf5 Qc7 33. Nxg7 { There were other flashy ways to win as well, but Nihal chooses the simplest and the best.} Kxg7 34. Bxh6+ {Another powerful piece sacrifice!} Kxh6 (34... Kg6 35. Qd2) 35. Rxf6+ Kg5 36. Rf5+ $1 (36. Rxf7 {was good but Nihal is more accurate!}) 36... Kh6 37. Qe2 {There is just no way to stop mate! What a game!} (37. Qe2 Rg8 38. Qh5+ Kg7 39. Re3 {Bringing the last piece to the party creates a nice impression.} (39. Rxf7+ $18)) 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.14"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2745"] [BlackElo "2656"] [PlyCount "60"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 O-O 8. Qd2 c5 (8... Nd7 9. O-O-O Nf6 10. Bd3 c5 11. Rhe1 Be6 12. Kb1 Qa5 13. a3 c4 14. Be2 Ne4 15. Qc1 d5 {Caruana,F (2819)-Duda,J (2729) Paris 2019}) 9. O-O-O Be6 10. a3 d5 {N} (10... Nd7 11. h4 Ne5 12. Ng5 Bf5 13. f3 b5 14. g4 Be6 15. Bf4 c4 16. Qe2 Qb8 17. Bg2 a5 {Gopal,G (2580)-Mosadeghpour,M (2337) Al Ain 2014 }) 11. h4 f6 12. h5 Nc6 13. Nh4 Qd7 14. f3 Rad8 15. g4 d4 16. Bf4 Ne5 17. Qe1 $2 ({A pawn sacrifice gives White decent play:} 17. Nf5 $1 Nxf3 (17... Bxf5 18. gxf5 Qxf5 $2 19. Bh3) 18. Qe2 Ne5 19. cxd4 cxd4 20. h6) 17... Qd5 $1 18. b3 c4 $1 {Suddenly Black has an overwhelming attack, almost out of nothing.} 19. Rxd4 Qa5 20. Bxc4 Bxc4 21. bxc4 Bxa3+ 22. Kd1 Bb4 ({The quiet} 22... Rfe8 {was strong as well.}) 23. Rxd8 Rxd8+ 24. Ke2 Bxc3 25. Qb1 Bd2 26. Bg3 Bg5 27. Be1 Qc5 28. Qb3 Bxh4 29. Bxh4 Nxc4 30. Re1 Re8+ ({Preparing with} 30... Kh8 { would still give Black a win, but Nisipeanu graciously allows Nakamura to leave the tournament with a draw.}) 1/2-1/2 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.14"] [Round "11.24"] [White "Xu, Xiangyu"] [Black "Inarkiev, Ernesto"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E21"] [WhiteElo "2576"] [BlackElo "2693"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "91"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Bd2 O-O 6. e3 c5 ({Another plan is: } 6... Bb7 7. Bd3 d6 8. O-O Nbd7 9. a3 Bxc3 10. Bxc3 Ne4 {Braun,A (2598) -Donchenko,A (2604) chess.com INT 2019}) 7. Bd3 Ba6 8. a3 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 d5 { N A logical novelty.} ({It will be interesting to learn why did Inarkiev deviate from} 9... cxd4 10. exd4 d5 11. b3 Qc7 12. Rc1 Rc8 13. Bb2 dxc4 14. bxc4 Nbd7 15. O-O Bb7 16. d5 exd5 17. Nd4 Re8 18. cxd5 Qe5 {1/2-1/2 (18) Gligoric,S-O'Kelly de Galway,A Palma de Mallorca 1967}) 10. dxc5 dxc4 11. Bc2 Nbd7 ({White is somewhat better in the endgame after} 11... Qxd1+ 12. Rxd1 Nd5 13. Ne5) 12. cxb6 axb6 13. h4 $5 {An interesting concept. Since White did not castle yet it seems attractive to bring one major piece to help the bishops. Or two. The question is if White has the time to do it with the king in the center.} Qc7 {Inarkiev wants to win a tempo by chasing the queen from the open file. This however, is a risky strategy as the almighty majesty does want to meet the black king at his residence.} ({More solid seems to be challenging the bishops at once with:} 13... Nd5 {The attack would not be dangerous without the dark-squared bishop:} 14. Qd4 ({If} 14. Bd4 c3 15. bxc3 Qc7 { pointing at the fact that White did not castle yet.}) 14... Nxc3 15. Qxc3 Nc5) 14. Qd4 Rfd8 15. h5 h6 16. Rh3 Kf8 {A serious inaccuracy. The king is not safer there.} (16... e5 17. Qh4 {does not change much.}) ({However, it made sense to adopt this defensive set-up:} 16... Nc5 17. Qh4 Ne8 $1 (17... Qe7 18. Rg3 {is less attractive for Black.}) 18. Rg3 f6 19. Qg4 e5 {From the two white bishops the most annoying is the one without an opponent. Therefore, Black needs to build a wall against it as soon as possible.}) 17. Rg3 Bb7 ({With the king already on f8, the aforementioned plan is not good:} 17... Nc5 18. Qh4 Ne8 19. Qg4 f6 20. Nh4) 18. Qh4 Qd6 ({Or} 18... Bxf3 19. gxf3 {followed by Ke1-e2 and a massive attack on the kingside.}) ({Apparently, the computer fears White's attack so much that it suggests the positional exchange sacrifice:} 18... Ra5 19. Bxa5 bxa5) 19. Rd1 Qe7 20. Qxc4 {A small snack in the middle of the attack.} ({Xu, however, missed a far more delicious dish. The beautiful} 20. Rxd7 $3 {was gaining material in all lines. For example:} Nxd7 ({If} 20... Rxd7 21. Bb4 Rd6 22. Rxg7 $1 Kxg7 23. Qg3+ {with a decisive attack on the dark squares.}) (20... Qxd7 {stumbles into the magic:} 21. Bb4+ Ke8 22. Qxf6 $1) 21. Bxg7+ Ke8 22. Qf4 {with an unstoppable attack.}) 20... Nc5 21. Rxd8+ Rxd8 22. Qh4 {As if nothing happened, Xu resumes the attack.} Be4 {Finally, Inarkiev challenges the bishop, however...} ({Had he known what was about to happen, he might have chosen} 22... Rc8 {although this should not have changed the final outcome.}) 23. Rxg7 $3 {No mercy in the second window of opportunity!} Kxg7 ({ Black could have also tried to checkmate, for a change. But he will be one tempo short:} 23... Bxc2 24. Bxf6 Rd1+ ({After} 24... Qd7 25. Nd4 {is the simplest win.}) 25. Ke2 Qd6 ({In case of} 25... Qd7 26. Rg8+ $1 Kxg8 27. Qg3+ { The king lacks an escape square on d7 and Black faces heavy material losses:} Bg6 (27... Kf8 28. Qg7+ Ke8 29. Qg8#) 28. Qb8+) 26. Be7+ $1 {winning the queen after} Qxe7 27. Rg8+) 24. Bxe4 Ncd7 ({If Black trades more pieces, the pin will be still unbearable even in the endgame:} 24... Ncxe4 25. Qxe4 Qd6 26. Qd4 $1 Qxd4 27. Bxd4 {Now White threatens all sorts of knight pickings, like Nf3-h2-g4 or the kingside pawn advance. The only way to break the pin is:} e5 ( {The knight endgame is obviously lost:} 27... Rxd4 28. Nxd4 Nxh5) 28. Nxe5 Kf8 29. Bxb6 {But that leaves Black poor and pawnless.}) 25. Ne5 $1 {The decisive reinforcement.} Rc8 ({Otherwise the pin is unbearable:} 25... Nxe5 26. Bxe5 Rc8 27. Qg3+ Kh8 28. Qf4 Kg7 29. g4 {with g4-g5 coming.}) 26. Nxd7 Rxc3 {This bishop costed Black too dearly.} 27. Qg3+ {Winning a whole piece.} ({Less precise is:} 27. bxc3 Qxd7) 27... Kh8 28. Nxf6 Qxf6 29. bxc3 Qxc3+ 30. Ke2 f5 31. Bd3 Qb2+ 32. Kf3 Qxa3 33. Qe5+ Kh7 34. Qc7+ Kg8 35. Qd8+ Kf7 36. Bc4 Qa4 37. Qc8 (37. Qc7+ Kf6 38. Kf4 {would have the need to calculate, but Xu is in control.}) 37... Qd1+ 38. Kf4 ({Or} 38. Kg3 Qg4+ 39. Kh2 Qxh5+ 40. Kg1 Qd1+ 41. Bf1) 38... Qd6+ 39. Kf3 Qd1+ 40. Be2 Qd5+ 41. Kg3 Qe5+ 42. Kh3 Qb2 43. Bc4 Qe5 44. Qd7+ Kf6 45. Qd8+ Kf7 46. Qxb6 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.14"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Firouzja, Alireza"] [Black "Dubov, Daniil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2702"] [BlackElo "2699"] [PlyCount "136"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. c3 Nf6 6. Re1 O-O 7. h3 Qb6 8. a4 ( 8. Na3 d5 9. e5 Ne8 10. d4 cxd4 11. cxd4 Nc7 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. Bg5 Re8 { Shirov, A (2658)-Fedoseev,V (2681) Riga 2019}) 8... a6 9. Bxc6 bxc6 10. e5 {N} (10. a5 Qc7 11. d3 d5 12. e5 Nd7 13. Bf4 f6 14. exf6 Qxf4 15. fxg7 Rf7 16. Nbd2 Kxg7 {Majeric,Z (2366)-Kosztolanczi,G (2230) Ajka 2004}) 10... Nd5 11. a5 Qd8 12. d3 d6 13. Qa4 dxe5 14. Nxe5 Bxe5 15. Rxe5 Qd6 16. Re1 Bf5 17. Na3 Rfe8 18. Nc4 Qc7 19. Be3 Nxe3 20. Rxe3 Rad8 21. Ne5 f6 22. Qxc6 Qd6 23. Qxd6 exd6 24. Ng4 Rxe3 25. fxe3 Rb8 26. Nxf6+ Kg7 27. Nd5 Rxb2 28. e4 Bd7 29. Rf1 Be6 30. Nc7 Bd7 31. Nxa6 Rb7 32. c4 Be8 33. e5 Ra7 34. Nb8 Rb7 35. Na6 Ra7 36. Nb8 Rb7 37. exd6 $3 {An early candidate for Move of the Tournament.} Rxb8 38. Re1 Kf8 ({ The alternative was to play more actively:} 38... Bc6 39. a6 Kf6) 39. Re7 Rd8 40. a6 Rxd6 41. a7 Rd8 (41... Ra6 42. Rc7 Ra2 43. Kh2 Ra3 44. Kg3 Rxd3+ 45. Kf4 Ra3 46. Ke5) 42. Rb7 Bc6 43. Rc7 Be8 44. Kf2 {The white rook and pawn dominate Black's position completely, and bringing the king will do the rest.} g5 45. Ke3 h6 46. g3 Bg6 47. Rb7 Rxd3+ 48. Kf2 Ra3 49. Rb8+ Kg7 50. a8=Q Rxa8 51. Rxa8 Bd3 52. Ra4 Kf6 53. Ke3 Bf1 54. h4 gxh4 55. gxh4 Ke5 56. Ra6 Bxc4 57. Rxh6 Be6 58. Rg6 Bf5 59. Rg1 Kf6 60. h5 Bh7 61. h6 Bg6 62. Kd2 Kf7 63. Kc3 Kf6 64. Kc4 Bf7+ 65. Kxc5 Bg6 66. Kd6 Kf7 67. Ke5 Bd3 68. Rg7+ Kf8 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.14"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Anton Guijarro, David"] [Black "Wei, Yi"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A20"] [WhiteElo "2674"] [BlackElo "2721"] [PlyCount "106"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 h5 (3... g6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. e3 Nge7 6. Nge2 O-O 7. O-O d6 8. d3 Rb8 9. b3 a6 {Ding,L (2805)-Caruana,F (2818) Saint Louis 2019}) 4. h3 d6 5. Nc3 h4 6. g4 f5 7. gxf5 Bxf5 8. d3 Nf6 {N} (8... Qd7 9. e4 Be6 10. Nge2 g6 11. Be3 Bg7 12. Qd2 a6 13. f4 Nge7 14. Nd5 Nd4 {Moor,R (2392)-Degtiarev,E (2425) Switzerland 2015}) 9. Nf3 Be7 10. d4 Qd7 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Qxd7+ Nxd7 13. O-O O-O-O 14. Nd5 Bf6 15. Be3 e4 16. Nd2 Rhe8 17. Nxf6 gxf6 18. Rac1 Nf8 19. Nb1 Bh7 20. Nc3 f5 21. Nd5 Ne6 22. Rcd1 Rf8 23. f4 Rd7 24. Bf2 Rg7 25. Bxh4 Ncd4 26. Rd2 c6 27. Ne3 (27. Kh1 $1 {would have been a nice move here. The computer likes White.} cxd5 28. cxd5 {wins back a piece.}) 27... Bg6 28. Kh2 Bh5 29. Rf2 Rd7 30. Bf1 a5 31. Ng2 a4 32. Kh1 Rh7 33. Bg5 c5 34. h4 Re8 35. Ne3 Reh8 36. Rh2 $6 {From this point Wei Yi takes over the game.} (36. Bf6 Rg8 37. Rg2 {was still a bit better for White.}) 36... Nxg5 37. fxg5 $2 ({White didn't need to be afraid of} 37. hxg5 Bf3+ 38. exf3 Nxf3 39. Rxh7 Rxh7+ 40. Kg2 Rh2+ 41. Kg3 Rxd2 {because of} 42. Bh3 Kd8 43. g6 Ke7 44. Bxf5 Re2 45. Nd5+ Kf8 46. Bxe4 Rxe4 47. Kxf3 Rxc4 {=}) 37... f4 38. Nd5 e3 39. Rxd4 {A sad necessity.} ( 39. Rd1 f3) (39. Rd3 Bg6) 39... cxd4 40. Nxf4 Be8 41. Kg2 Rxh4 42. Rxh4 Rxh4 43. Kg3 Rh1 44. Bh3+ Kc7 45. Ne6+ Kd6 46. Nxd4 Rb1 47. Kf4 Rxb2 48. Bf5 Rxa2 49. g6 a3 50. g7 Bf7 51. Bh7 Rxe2 52. Nb5+ Kc5 53. Nxa3 Ra2 0-1 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.15"] [Round "2.3"] [White "Safarli, Eltaj"] [Black "Nihal Sarin"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2593"] [BlackElo "2610"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "121"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "1500+10"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nc6 { [%emt 0:00:00]} 3. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Bc5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 4. c3 {0 No Evans Gambit this time!} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 5. b4 $5 {0 Safarli remembers the magic formula! b4 has to be played. This is not as popular as d3 or d4 but has been played many times before.} Be7 {87} (5... Bb6 {is another possibility.}) 6. d3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:32]} 7. O-O {[%emt 0:00:03]} d5 { [%emt 0:00:51]} 8. exd5 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 9. Re1 {[%emt 0: 00:05]} Bg4 {[%emt 0:00:15]} (9... Bf6 {Looked like a solid way to continue.} 10. b5 Na5 11. Nxe5 Nxc4 12. dxc4 Nb6 $15) 10. h3 {[%emt 0:00:17]} Bh5 { [%emt 0:00:15]} 11. b5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Na5 {[%emt 0:00:55]} 12. Rxe5 {[%emt 0: 00:04]} Nf6 {79} (12... Nxc4 13. Rxh5 (13. dxc4 Nf6 14. Qxd8 Bxd8 15. Nbd2 $16) ) 13. Nbd2 {706 Black has lost a pawn but in return he has excellent compensation. White's position is a bit overstretched.} Bd6 {128} 14. Re1 { [%emt 0:00:08]} Re8 $5 {78 A very interesting move and not the first move that comes to mind. Usually you want to connect your rooks with Qd7 and then challenge on the open file. But it turns out that ...Re8 is a pretty good move. } (14... Qd7 $5) 15. g4 {257 Somehow it felt like White was taking too much of a liberty with this move. His king is also weakened.} Bg6 {[%emt 0:00:36]} 16. d4 {87} Nxc4 {151} 17. Nxc4 Qd7 (17... Rxe1+ $1 18. Qxe1 Qd7 19. Nce5 Qxb5 20. c4 Qa4 $1 $11) 18. Nce5 {165} (18. a4 Nxg4 $1 $17) 18... Qxb5 {54 Black has recovered the pawn and should be even. White's knights in the centre are what hold his position together. Black would like to get rid of them, but it is not so easy.} 19. c4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Qa6 {[%emt 0:00:29]} 20. Be3 {183} Rad8 {371} (20... c5 $5) 21. Qb3 {[%emt 0:00:11]} c5 {339} 22. Nxg6 {[%emt 0:00:08]} cxd4 {102} 23. Bxd4 {[%emt 0:00:01]} hxg6 {[%emt 0:00:12]} 24. Rxe8+ {[%emt 0:00:01] } Rxe8 {[%emt 0:00:20]} 25. Qb5 {27 Nihal didn't want to take on b5 and straighten White's structure to some extent, but that would have given him an easy draw.} Rc8 $6 {68} (25... Qxb5 26. cxb5 b6 $11 (26... a6 $11)) 26. Rd1 { 141} (26. Qxa6 bxa6 27. Rc1 {The c-pawn looks more of a strength here than a weakness.}) 26... Bf4 {[%emt 0:00:21]} 27. Qxa6 bxa6 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 28. Be5 $1 {124 A powerful idea found by Eltaj.} Bxe5 {[%emt 0:00:12]} 29. Nxe5 { 1 After this Black is in trouble from multiple fronts. His back rank is slightly weak. The knight on e5 is solidly placed with f4 coming up. The pawns on a-file are weak and the c pawn is turning into more of strength than a weakness.} Kf8 {[%emt 0:00:14]} 30. Rd6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} a5 {[%emt 0:00:16]} 31. Ra6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rc5 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 32. f4 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Rc7 { [%emt 0:00:11]} 33. Rxa5 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Ne4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} (33... Nd7 { was perhaps better.}) 34. Kg2 {[%emt 0:00:13]} g5 {[%emt 0:00:16]} 35. fxg5 { [%emt 0:00:42]} Nxg5 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 36. c5 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Ne6 {[%emt 0:00: 20]} 37. Kf3 {[%emt 0:00:08]} Ke7 {[%emt 0:00:13]} (37... Rxc5 38. Nd7+ $18) ( 37... Nxc5 38. Rxc5 Rxc5 39. Nd7+ $18) 38. Nd3 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Kd7 {[%emt 0: 00:12]} 39. h4 {[%emt 0:00:09]} f6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 40. Ke4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Ke7 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 41. a3 {[%emt 0:00:17]} Nd8 {[%emt 0:00:14]} 42. Nf4 { [%emt 0:00:03]} Kf7 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 43. Nd5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Rd7 {[%emt 0:00: 02]} 44. Ra6 {19 Safarli's technique was impeccable. From a slightly better position, he has converted this into a complete win.} Ne6 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 45. Rc6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} g6 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 46. Rc8 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rb7 {[%emt 0: 00:16]} 47. c6 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Rb1 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 48. Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:24]} Re1+ {[%emt 0:00:13]} 49. Ne3 {[%emt 0:00:09]} f5+ {[%emt 0:00:06]} 50. gxf5 { [%emt 0:00:02]} gxf5+ {[%emt 0:00:01]} 51. Kd3 {[%emt 0:00:08]} Nf4+ {[%emt 0: 00:20]} (51... f4 52. Rxa7+ Kg6 53. Ng4 Kf5 {would give Black better fighting chances, but the position is lost all the same.}) 52. Kd2 {[%emt 0:00:27]} Re2+ 53. Kd1 Rxe3 {[%emt 0:00:26]} 54. c7 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Rc3 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 55. c8=Q {[%emt 0:00:03]} Rxc8 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 56. Rxc8 {1 The rest is easy.} Kg6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 57. Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Kh5 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 58. Rxa7 { [%emt 0:00:01]} Kxh4 59. a4 Nd5 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 60. a5 {[%emt 0:00:03]} f4 { [%emt 0:00:01]} 61. Ke2 {28 Safarli took a 1-0 lead in the match. Now Nihal was in a must-win situation.} 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.15"] [Round "2.4"] [White "Yu, Yangyi"] [Black "Adhiban, B....."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B93"] [WhiteElo "2763"] [BlackElo "2639"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "79"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "1500+10"] {Playing for a win with the black pieces against Yu Yangyi is never easy.} 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} c5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d6 {[%emt 0:00: 00]} 3. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} cxd4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 4. Nxd4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 5. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} a6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 6. f4 {19 When you play the Najdorf with Black White always has at his disposal certain sharp lines which can end in a theoretical draw. Here Adhiban has to be careful as he has to win at all costs.} Qc7 {[%emt 0:00:51]} 7. Bd3 {[%emt 0:00:40]} g6 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 8. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:50]} Bg7 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 9. O-O {[%emt 0: 00:10]} Nbd7 {[%emt 0:00:37]} 10. Qe1 {[%emt 0:00:29]} O-O {121} 11. Kh1 { [%emt 0:00:03]} e5 {180} 12. a4 {71} (12. Qh4 b5 13. fxe5 dxe5 14. Bh6 { is well known theory.}) 12... Nc5 {104} 13. Qh4 {[%emt 0:00:55]} exf4 {81} 14. Bxf4 {[%emt 0:00:08]} Be6 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 15. e5 $6 {78} (15. Ng5 {keeping the pressure was better.}) 15... Nh5 $1 {373} 16. exd6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Qd8 { [%emt 0:00:01]} 17. Bg5 {256} f6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 18. Be3 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Qxd6 $2 {[%emt 0:00:25]} (18... Nxd3 19. cxd3 Qxd6 20. Ne4 Qd5 $15) 19. Bc4 { [%emt 0:00:21]} Rae8 {265} 20. Rad1 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Qc7 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 21. Bd5 {67} (21. Rfe1 Bxc4 22. Qxc4+ Ne6 23. Qxc7 Nxc7 24. g4 $18) 21... Bxd5 {63} 22. Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:10]} Qc6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 23. Qc4 {141} (23. Qb4 {The idea is to attack the c5 knight and at the same time threaten g4.} Nd7 24. g4 $18) 23... Ne6 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 24. Qb3 {[%emt 0:00:01]} f5 {112} 25. Nd4 { [%emt 0:00:09]} Nxd4 {[%emt 0:00:29]} 26. Bxd4 {[%emt 0:00:15]} Kh8 {[%emt 0: 00:02]} 27. Bxg7+ {[%emt 0:00:27]} Nxg7 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 28. Rde1 {71} g5 { [%emt 0:00:25]} 29. c4 {[%emt 0:00:21]} f4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 30. a5 {[%emt 0:00: 40]} Rxe1 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 31. Rxe1 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Re8 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 32. Rxe8+ {80} Qxe8 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 33. Qc3 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Qe2 {153} 34. h3 { [%emt 0:00:17]} Kg8 {[%emt 0:00:25]} 35. Qf6 {[%emt 0:00:22]} Qe1+ {[%emt 0:00: 21]} 36. Kh2 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Qg3+ {[%emt 0:00:19]} 37. Kh1 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Qe1+ {[%emt 0:00:06]} 38. Kh2 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Qg3+ {[%emt 0:00:01]} 39. Kh1 { [%emt 0:00:01]} Qe1+ {[%emt 0:00:11]} 40. Kh2 {1 With this draw Yu Yangyi advanced to round three. Adhiban was knocked out.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.15"] [Round "12.13"] [White "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Black "Gelfand, Boris"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D43"] [WhiteElo "2716"] [BlackElo "2686"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 7. e3 g6 8. Be2 ( {A highly exciting battle emerged after} 8. Ne5 Bg7 9. f4 Nd7 10. h4 Qe7 11. Qc2 O-O 12. O-O-O Nxe5 13. fxe5 Bd7 14. g4 f6 15. Qxg6 fxe5 16. Bd3 e4 17. Nxe4 Be8 18. Nf6+ Rxf6 19. Qh7+ Kf8 20. g5 hxg5 21. hxg5 Rf7 22. Qh3 Rd8 23. g6 Rf6 24. Qh8+ Bxh8 25. Rxh8+ Kg7 26. Rh7+ Kf8 27. Rh8+ Kg7 28. Rh7+ Kf8 29. Rh8+ { 1/2 Mamedyarov,S (2764)-Giri,A (2779) Saint Louis 2019}) 8... Bg7 9. O-O O-O 10. Ne5 c5 11. cxd5 cxd4 12. exd4 exd5 13. Bf3 Nc6 14. Re1 Qd6 15. Nxf7 { N A rich novelty. Gelfand was definitely aware of it as he quickly picked up the correct continuation.} ({All of this had happened before and an email game went} 15. Nxd5 Nxe5 16. dxe5 Bxe5 17. g3 Be6 18. Qb3 Rad8 19. Rad1 Qb8 20. Qe3 Bg7 21. b3 Rfe8 22. Qc1 Kh7 23. Nf4 Rc8 24. Qa3 Bf5 25. Rxe8 Rxe8 26. Qb4 b6 { 1/2 Rodriguez,L (2107)-Ramos,E (2262) ICCF email 2016}) 15... Rxf7 16. Bxd5 Bf5 ({Worse is} 16... Bd7 17. Bxf7+ Kxf7 18. Nb5 Qb4 ({Black gets under nasty attack if he opts for} 18... Qf6 19. Qb3+ Kf8 20. Re3) 19. Qf3+ Kg8 20. Qd5+ Kh7 ({Or} 20... Kh8 21. Qxd7 Qxb5 22. d5 Nd4 (22... Rd8 23. Re8+ $1) 23. Qxb5 Nxb5 24. Re7 {with a clearly better endgame for White.}) 21. Qxd7 Qxb5 22. Re7 Rg8 23. Qxb7 {In comparison to the game Black lacks the additional chances related to the weak white king.}) (16... Qf4 17. Qb3 Qxf2+ 18. Kh1 Nxd4 19. Qc4 (19. Bxf7+ Qxf7 20. Re8+ Bf8 21. Rxf8+ Kxf8 22. Qb4+)) 17. g4 {A forced weakening.} ({As otherwise there is no visible follow-up of the attack in case of} 17. Bxf7+ Kxf7 18. Nb5 Qb4) 17... Bd7 18. Bxf7+ Kxf7 19. Nb5 Qb4 20. Qf3+ Kg8 21. Qd5+ Kh7 22. Qxd7 Qxb5 23. Re7 ({Not:} 23. d5 $2 Rd8 24. Qe6 Nd4 { with a decisive counter-attack.}) 23... Rg8 24. Rae1 {The end of the forcing line.} ({Due to the kingside weakening Matlakov can no longer liquidate into a favorable endgame:} 24. Qxb7 Qg5 25. Rxg7+ Rxg7 26. Qxc6 Qxg4+ 27. Qg2 Qxd4 { is equal.}) 24... Qxb2 ({The other move which deserved serious consideration was} 24... Qg5 $5 25. Rf7 ({True, White does not need to repeat and can keep on playing with} 25. Re8 {Then} Rxe8 26. Rxe8 Nxd4 27. Kf1) 25... Nd8 26. Rfe7 Nc6 {leads to repetition of the moves.}) 25. Qxb7 Qc2 ({Once more, it made sense to keep the queen close to the enemy king with} 25... Qc3 {Then} 26. Qc7 (26. R1e3 Qa1+ 27. Re1 {is only repetition.}) 26... Qf3 {looks annoying for White. In any case he would not have enough time to seize the seventh rank.}) 26. Qc7 Qa4 27. Qd7 ({It is too early for} 27. Rf7 Nxd4 28. Ree7 $2 Qd1+ { when Black attacks first.}) 27... Qc4 28. Rf7 Nxd4 29. Ree7 Kh8 ({The endgame after} 29... Qc1+ 30. Kg2 Qc6+ 31. f3 $1 Qxd7 32. Rxd7 {is very difficult for Black. He is practically paralized and the rook and the pawn are as a rule stronger than the minor pieces in the battle on two flanks.}) 30. Kg2 $1 { A very cool move, sidestepping the knight check and asking Black what is he doing.} (30. Rxg7 Rxg7 31. Rxg7 Nf3+ 32. Kg2 Ne1+ 33. Kg1 Nf3+ {would lead to a forcing draw instead.}) 30... Nc2 {The knight leaves the center. A bad sign for Gelfand.} ({However, it is understandable that he still does not like the endgame after} 30... Qc6+ 31. Qxc6 Nxc6 32. Re4) ({Most stubborn, however, is to use the same "sticking" idea from before} 30... Qc3 {The queen is ready for perpetual all the time:} 31. Rxg7 ({Therefore White will need to try and play for the win with} 31. Re8 Rxe8 32. Qxe8+ Kh7 33. Qe4 {when the white pieces are dominating, but the black ones are lurking in the grass, waiting for a good moment to come.}) 31... Qf3+) 31. Qe6 Qd3 ({If the endgame was very bad for Black, here it is simply unplayable.} 31... Qxe6 32. Rxe6 g5 33. Rxa7) 32. Re8 $1 {Matlakov wins material.} Rxe8 33. Qxe8+ Kh7 34. Qe5 Ne1+ 35. Qxe1 { Forced but good.} (35. Kg1 $2 Nf3+) 35... Qd5+ ({The last chance was:} 35... Qc4 36. Rf3 Qxg4+ 37. Rg3 Qc4 {although White should win here as well.}) 36. Rf3 Qxa2 37. Qe4 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.16"] [Round "19.9"] [White "Xu, Xiangyu"] [Black "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D38"] [WhiteElo "2576"] [BlackElo "2759"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 (3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 {was the move order of the game Chatalbashev,B (2552)-Docx,S (2427) Gent 2017 below.}) 3... Bb4 4. Nf3 d5 5. Qa4+ Nc6 6. e3 O-O 7. Qc2 (7. Bd2 {is the main line.}) 7... b6 ({The very solid line} 7... Bd6 8. c5 Be7 9. Bb5 Bd7 10. O-O a6 11. Bxc6 Bxc6 12. b4 Ne4 13. Ne5 Qe8 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 15. a4 Nxc3 16. Qxc3 Qd7 17. Bd2 c6 {led eventually to a draw in Mamedyarov,S (2765)-Dubov,D (2700) Paris 2019}) 8. Bd2 Bb7 { This leads to an already fresh position. According to my Megabase only two games have been played in the line.} ({In one of his previous games the Russian GM chose} 8... a5 9. Bd3 Ba6 10. cxd5 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 exd5 12. Rc1 Ne7 { Vitiugov,N (2718)-Grischuk,A (2751) Novi Sad 2016}) 9. a3 (9. cxd5 exd5 10. Bd3 Bd6 {was Chatalbashev,B (2552)-Docx,S (2427) Gent 2017}) 9... Bd6 10. cxd5 { The first lenghthy thought by the Chinese player.} exd5 11. Bd3 a6 12. Ne2 { N This novelty has been played after almost half an hour of thought.} ({ Both predecessors saw} 12. O-O {when Black opted for either} Nb8 ({Or} 12... Re8 13. b4 Nb8 14. b5 a5 15. a4 Nbd7 {Chatalbashev,B (2552)-Docx,S (2427) Gent 2017}) 13. b4 Qe7 14. Rfb1 Re8 15. a4 c6 16. Ne5 Bxe5 17. dxe5 Qxe5 18. Ne2 { Tabatabaei,M (2590)-Alekseev,E (2639) Bandar e Anzali 2019}) 12... Ne7 13. Bc3 {Xu stops the c7-c5 advance...} ({There is no time for} 13. Ng3 c5) 13... Ne4 $1 {...but allows another unpleasant move. If the knight is left where it is the kingside attack will run smoothly.} 14. Bxe4 {Therefore White ventures into a risky line.} ({Objectively speaking:} 14. O-O {should have been preferred.}) 14... dxe4 15. Ng5 {Black loses a pawn, but in the process all his long-ranged pieces are freed.} Nd5 {A cautious move. Grischuk makes sure there will be no long-ranged pieces eyeing his king.} ({Also interesting was} 15... Nf5 16. Nxe4 Qh4 17. N4g3 (17. N2g3 Nxe3 $1 {as below.}) 17... Nxg3 18. fxg3 (18. Nxg3 Bxg2 {would be similar to the game except that instead of a knight there is a bishop on c3.}) 18... Qe7 {with good compensation for a pawn. }) 16. Nxe4 Qh4 17. N4g3 ({Worse is} 17. N2g3 $2 Nxe3 $1 18. fxe3 Bxe4 { with a clear advantage for Black.}) ({The other forcing line also favors the second player:} 17. Nxd6 Nxe3 $1 18. Qd3 Nxg2+ 19. Kf1 Nf4 20. Nf5 ({Or} 20. Nxf4 Bxh1) 20... Nxd3 21. Nxh4 Bxh1 {as the black knight cannot be trapped:} 22. Rd1 g5) 17... Nxc3 18. Nxc3 Bxg2 {Black regains the pawn, however now some files are opened against his king. It all gets very, very sharp.} 19. Rg1 Bf3 $1 ({More open files mean more problems for Black:} 19... Qxh2 20. O-O-O Bf3 { White can already regain the material with} 21. Rh1 ({Or play for attack with} 21. Nf5 $5) ({Or} 21. Rde1 $5) 21... Bxh1 22. Rxh1 Bxg3 23. Rxh2 Bxh2) 20. Nf5 Qxh2 21. Rxg7+ Kh8 {All of this was forced and Xu hurries to bring on the reserves with} 22. Ne4 ({The other option was} 22. Ne2 {when Black can practically force a draw with} Rg8 ({Or play on with} 22... Qh5 23. Neg3 ({Not } 23. Nxd6 Kxg7) 23... Bxg3 24. Rxg3 Qh1+ 25. Kd2 Qxa1 26. Rxf3 {with compensation for the exchange.}) 23. Rxg8+ Rxg8 24. Nxd6 cxd6 25. Qf5 Rg1+ 26. Nxg1 Qxg1+ 27. Kd2 Qxa1 28. Qf6+ Kg8 29. Qd8+ Kg7 30. Qg5+ {and perpetual.}) 22... Bh5 {Black on his turn hurries to bring on the reserves and hopes to trap the rook.} ({Grischuk avoids the devilish trap} 22... Qh1+ $2 23. Kd2 Qxa1 ({Even worse is} 23... Bxe4 24. Rxh1 Bxc2 25. Rhxh7#) 24. Nf6 Qh1 25. Rxh7+ Qxh7 26. Nxh7 Kxh7 27. Nxd6+ {when White should win.}) ({However, safer was} 22... Rg8 23. Rxg8+ Rxg8 24. Kd2 Rg6) 23. Nf6 Bg6 {The point. It should be said that the previous play exhausted both players' clocks. Especially White's. } 24. O-O-O {According to the computer, this most natural move is a mistake. There is a huge difference if the white king is on d2 or c1!} ({The machine finds this play best:} 24. Qe4 $1 Qh3 25. Rxh7+ $3 Bxh7 26. Nxh7 Qxh7 ({Instead } 26... Kxh7 $2 {loses after} 27. Nxd6+ Kg8 28. Kd2 cxd6 29. Rg1+) ({However} 26... Rae8 $5 {is possible with unclear endgame after} 27. Ng5 Rxe4 28. Nxh3) 27. Kd2 Rae8 28. Qf3 {Ra1-h1 is a major threat, which means that Black's next move is forced} Bh2 $1 29. Rh1 Rg8 $1 {The threat is Rg8-g1, but White has} 30. Ne7 $3 Rxe7 31. Qf6+ Rg7 32. Qxe7 {Then} Qh5 {is well met with} (32... Rg2 33. Qf8+ Rg8 34. Qe7 {only repeats moves.}) 33. Qe8+ Rg8 ({Not:} 33... Kh7 $2 34. Qe5 $1) 34. Qe5+ Qxe5 35. dxe5 Rg2 36. Ke2 Kg7 37. Kf3 Rg5 38. Rxh2 Rxe5 { with a drawn rook endgame!!}) 24... Be7 {A blunder says the computer, but apparently both players believed it was already over for White.} ({On his turn, Grischuk misses the computer idea:} 24... Qh3 $3 25. Rxh7+ Bxh7 26. Nxh7 Qxh7 27. Qe4 Rae8 28. Qf3 (28. Qg2 Rg8 {loses a vital tempo.}) 28... Bh2 29. Rh1 Rg8 {Now in comparison to before, the line} 30. Ne7 Rxe7 31. Qf6+ Rg7 32. Qxe7 Qh5 33. Qe8+ Rg8 34. Qe5+ Qxe5 35. dxe5 {no longer works as} Rg1+ $1 {is a check. This is where the difference between 0-0-0 and Kd2 becomes evident.}) 25. Qc6 { With seconds on the clock Xu misses a win!} ({The following brilliant stuff} 25. Rxh7+ $3 Bxh7 26. Nxh7 Qxh7 27. Qe4 Bd6 28. Rh1 Bh2 29. Qg2 {would have won the game for him.}) ({Moreover} 25. Ng4 Qh5 26. Rxg6 {was also far from clear, and even worse for White after} fxg6 ({Or} 26... hxg6 27. Nxe7 Qxg4 28. d5) 27. Nxe7 Qxg4 28. Rh1 Rf6 29. Qxc7 {White definitely has enough for the exchange.}) (25. Rxg6 hxg6 26. Ng4 {would have transposed to the line from above.}) 25... Bxf5 26. Rdg1 {The last attempt. It could easily have worked in time trouble.} Bg6 ({For instance, an obvious move like} 26... Bd6 $2 {would reveal White's idea:} 27. R7g2 $1 Qh3 28. Qxa8 $1 Rxa8 29. Rg8+ Rxg8 30. Rxg8#) ({The aforementioned line worked only because the black queen was removed from the rook. It would not work after} 26... Qxf2 27. Qxa8 Qxg1+ $1) 27. R1xg6 hxg6 28. Rh7+ Qxh7 29. Nxh7 Kxh7 {The extra material wins easily. The only task is to reach the time-control.} 30. Kd2 Bd6 31. e4 Rad8 32. Ke3 Rfe8 33. f4 (33. e5 Re6 34. f4 Kg7 {leads to the same.}) 33... Re6 34. e5 Kg7 ({Not the hasty} 34... Bxe5 $2 35. Qh1+) 35. Qb7 c5 36. d5 ({Or} 36. Qxb6 Bxe5 37. Qxd8 Bf6+) 36... Re7 37. Qxb6 Bxe5 $1 38. fxe5 (38. Qxd8 Bf6+ {and whereever the king goes there's a discovery check.}) 38... Rxe5+ 39. Kf3 Rexd5 0-1 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.16"] [Round "3.1"] [White "Alekseenko, Kirill"] [Black "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C50"] [WhiteElo "2671"] [BlackElo "2746"] [PlyCount "103"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 d6 6. c3 a6 7. a4 h6 8. Re1 O-O 9. h3 Re8 ({It's probably better to avoid White's queenside expansion with} 9... a5 10. Nbd2 Be6 11. Bb5 Na7 12. d4 Nxb5 13. dxc5 Na7 14. b3 Re8 15. cxd6 Qxd6 16. Ba3 c5 {Carlsen,M (2882)-So,W (2776) Saint Louis 2019}) 10. a5 Ba7 11. Qb3 {N This logical move is a novelty.} (11. Nbd2 Be6 12. Bxe6 Rxe6 13. Nc4 d5 14. exd5 Qxd5 15. Ne3 Bxe3 16. Bxe3 Rd8 {Nevednichy,V (2541)-Foisor,C (2360) Medias 2016}) 11... Qe7 12. Be3 Bxe3 13. Rxe3 Rb8 14. d4 b5 15. axb6 cxb6 16. Nbd2 b5 17. Bf1 Qc7 18. d5 $1 Ne7 19. c4 b4 (19... bxc4 20. Qa3 $1) 20. Qa4 Nd7 21. Qa5 Qxa5 22. Rxa5 f5 23. Nb3 $1 fxe4 24. Nfd2 Nf6 25. Nxe4 Nxe4 26. Rxe4 Bf5 27. Re1 Bc2 28. Nd2 Nf5 29. Rxa6 Red8 30. Rea1 Nd4 31. Ra7 Rf8 32. R1a6 Rbd8 33. Rb6 b3 34. Rbb7 g5 35. c5 dxc5 36. Bc4 Rf6 37. Re7 Kf8 38. Rxe5 Rf7 39. Ra6 Kg7 40. f3 Rdd7 41. d6 Rf8 42. Rxc5 Rfd8 43. Rd5 Nf5 44. Bxb3 Ne3 45. Re5 Rxd6 46. Rxd6 Rxd6 47. Rxe3 Rxd2 48. Bxc2 Rxc2 49. Rb3 h5 50. h4 gxh4 51. Kh2 Rc1 52. Rb4 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.16"] [Round "3.1"] [White "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Black "Yuffa, Daniil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B11"] [WhiteElo "2758"] [BlackElo "2577"] [PlyCount "89"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nc3 Bg4 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3 e6 6. Be2 Bc5 7. O-O Ne7 8. Qg3 (8. Na4 Bd6 9. d4 dxe4 10. Qxe4 Nd7 11. Rd1 O-O 12. Qf3 Qa5 13. Nc3 Nf6 14. Ne4 Nxe4 15. Qxe4 Rad8 {Vachier Lagrave,M (2783)-Mamedyarov,S (2784) Paris 2017 }) 8... O-O 9. d3 Nd7 10. Kh1 {N} (10. exd5 cxd5 11. Bf4 Nf5 12. Qh2 Nd4 13. Bd1 b5 14. Ne2 Nxe2+ 15. Bxe2 Qb6 16. Qg3 Rfe8 17. Bh6 Bf8 18. c3 Nf6 {Elez,N (2168)-Bodiroga,P (2358) Kac 2014}) 10... f5 $5 11. Bg5 Bd4 (11... Kh8) 12. Qd6 Bf6 13. f4 Rf7 ({Better was} 13... Kh8 $1 {with the idea} 14. Qxe6 $2 Nc5) 14. Bxf6 Rxf6 15. e5 Rf7 16. d4 {This is pleasant for White.} Nc8 17. Qb4 Qb6 18. a3 c5 (18... a5 $5) 19. Qxb6 Ncxb6 20. Nb5 Re7 21. b3 cxd4 22. Nxd4 Nc5 23. g4 Ne4 24. Rg1 {White got everything he wanted and is clearly better now.} Rf8 25. gxf5 exf5 26. h4 g6 27. Rg2 Kf7 28. h5 Rh8 29. Rag1 Ree8 30. a4 a6 31. a5 Nd7 32. c4 $1 ({Even better than} 32. e6+ Rxe6 33. Nxe6 Kxe6) 32... dxc4 33. e6+ Rxe6 34. Bxc4 Nf8 35. hxg6+ hxg6+ 36. Rh2 Rg8 37. Nxe6 Nxe6 38. Rh6 Nf2+ 39. Kg2 Ne4 40. Kh2 Nf2 41. Bxe6+ Kxe6 42. Rhxg6+ Rxg6 43. Rxg6+ Kd7 44. Rb6 Kc7 45. Kg3 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.16"] [Round "3.1"] [White "Alekseenko, Kirill"] [Black "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C50"] [WhiteElo "2671"] [BlackElo "2746"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "103"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nc6 { [%emt 0:00:00]} 3. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:22]} Bc5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 4. O-O {[%emt 0: 00:55]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:12]} 5. d3 {[%emt 0:00:23]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:36]} (5... O-O 6. c3 d6 7. h3 h6 8. Re1 a6 {1-0 (43) Carlsen,M (2882)-So,W (2776) Saint Louis 2019}) 6. c3 {[%emt 0:00:41]} a6 {[%emt 0:00:36]} 7. a4 {[%emt 0:00:41]} h6 {28 has been played a lot by Karjakin.} (7... Ba7 {is the main move in the position.} 8. Re1 O-O 9. h3 h6 10. Nbd2 Re8 11. b4 Be6 12. Bxe6 Rxe6 {with a typical Italian position.}) 8. Re1 {[%emt 0:00:33]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:18]} 9. h3 {[%emt 0:00:45]} Re8 {85 Black would like to play Be6 and exchange the bishops and take back on e6 with the rook. It's with this in mind that Black played ... Re8.} (9... a5 $5 {Karjakin likes to play this always claiming space on the queenside.} 10. Nbd2 Be6 11. Bb5 Na7 12. d4 Nxb5 13. dxc5 Na7 {This was seen in the recent game Carlsen vs So.} 14. b3 Re8 15. cxd6 Qxd6 16. Ba3 c5 17. Nc4 Qxd1 18. Raxd1 Bxc4 19. bxc4 {Carlsen went on to win this, but it seems like objectively this position is completely fine for Black. 1-0 (43) Carlsen,M (2882)-So,W (2776) Saint Louis 2019}) 10. a5 $5 {14 This is a new move in the position. Previously White has played Nbd2 here in over 40 games. The main point is that although a5 cramps the queenside, it still loses time and Black should be able to find a way to equalize.} Ba7 {169} (10... Be6 $5 {Maybe he was afraid of} 11. Bxe6 Rxe6 $1 (11... fxe6 12. b4 $14 {is already a slight edge for White.}) 12. d4 {It seems that Black is losing a piece, but there are still some tricks in the position.} exd4 13. cxd4 Bb4 14. d5 Bxe1 15. Nxe1 (15. dxe6 Bxa5 $17) 15... Rxe4 16. dxc6 bxc6 {Black has a rook and two pawns for two minor pieces. The position should be close to equal, or slightly better for White.}) 11. Qb3 {[%emt 0:00:21]} Qe7 {182} (11... Re7 12. Nbd2 (12. Be3 Bxe3 13. Rxe3 Rb8 {now d4 is not so easy to execute because the e4 pawn would hang in many lines. With the queen on e7 this resource was not available for Black.} 14. Nbd2 (14. d4 exd4 15. cxd4 Nxe4 $15) 14... Be6 15. Bxe6 Rxe6 16. d4 Re8 17. d5 Ne7 18. c4 {White is surely better, but without the b5/b6 moves there is one less headache for Black.}) 12... Rb8 13. Qa2 Be6 14. Bxe6 Rxe6 15. Nc4 {White has some pressure in the position, but Black should be fine.}) 12. Be3 {323} Bxe3 {683} 13. Rxe3 {267} Rb8 {95} 14. d4 $1 {341 No time for Be6.} b5 {196 At first this seems like a weak move because after enpassant you get a weakness on a6. But the question is what should black really do here? Don't you think he has landed into a passive position that is quite difficult to hold.} (14... exd4 15. cxd4 Nxe4 $2 16. Nc3 Bf5 17. Bd5 $1 $18 (17. Rae1 Nxa5 $15)) 15. axb6 {244} cxb6 {149 This exchange of a-pawn for the c-pawn is just positionally bad. Black should avoid it at all costs.} (15... Rxb6 {Although not so great, should have been tried.} 16. Qc2 $14 {White looks better, but this is much better than what happened in the game.}) 16. Nbd2 {335 Alekseenko completes his development.} b5 {222} 17. Bf1 {568} Qc7 {[%emt 0:00:58]} 18. d5 $1 {382} Ne7 {62} 19. c4 {41 White is just better. His pieces are so well placed and he also has the space advantage. Black on the other hand has nothing really going his way.} b4 {473} (19... Ng6 20. Rc3 $16) (19... bxc4 20. Qxc4 Qxc4 21. Nxc4 $16 {White's play is quite easy.}) 20. Qa4 {82} Nd7 {531} 21. Qa5 {[%emt 0:00:54]} Qxa5 {574} 22. Rxa5 {[%emt 0:00:38]} f5 {13 Harikrishna tries for some counterplay in this position, but all that White has to do is keep control. Positionally he is already winning.} (22... Nc5 23. Nb3 $1 (23. Nxe5 Nb7 24. Rxa6 dxe5 25. Nb3 $16 {Even after giving up a piece, White is still better.}) 23... Nxb3 24. Rxb3 $18 {White is just winning.}) 23. Nb3 {282} fxe4 {497} 24. Nfd2 {182} Nf6 {169} 25. Nxe4 {61} Nxe4 {81} 26. Rxe4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Bf5 {71 Hari decides to give up his a6 pawn for activity but this is not going to be sufficient.} 27. Re1 {72} Bc2 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 28. Nd2 {69} Nf5 {256} 29. Rxa6 {125} Red8 {88} 30. Rea1 {709} Nd4 {170} 31. Ra7 {92} Rf8 {319} 32. R1a6 {114} Rbd8 {290} 33. Rb6 {587 The rook is coming to b7 and the rooks doubled on the seventh rank is going to be extremely strong.} b3 { [%emt 0:00:29]} 34. Rbb7 {137} g5 {8 White has maximized his position. It is quite impressive to see how resolutely Alekseenko continues.} 35. c5 $1 {190} dxc5 {[%emt 0:00:23]} 36. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:43]} Rf6 {173} 37. Re7 {68} Kf8 {156} 38. Rxe5 {[%emt 0:00:54]} Rf7 {168} 39. Ra6 {72} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:46]} 40. f3 { [%emt 0:00:00]} Rdd7 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 41. d6 $1 {251} Rf8 {258} 42. Rxc5 { [%emt 0:00:29]} Rfd8 {133} 43. Rd5 {95} Nf5 {82} 44. Bxb3 {64} Ne3 {[%emt 0:00: 08]} 45. Re5 {298} Rxd6 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 46. Rxd6 {[%emt 0:00:20]} Rxd6 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 47. Rxe3 {[%emt 0:00:37]} Rxd2 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 48. Bxc2 { [%emt 0:00:04]} Rxc2 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 49. Rb3 {6 It's quite rare that Hari lands up in a rook endgame with two pawns down without a real fight.} h5 {113} 50. h4 {[%emt 0:00:08]} gxh4 {105} 51. Kh2 {[%emt 0:00:13]} Rc1 {[%emt 0:00:48] } 52. Rb4 {24 A tremendous game by Alekseenko.} 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.16"] [Round "3.1"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D38"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2718"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "185"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} (2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 {1/2-1/2 (27) Wojtaszek,R (2722) -Vidit,S (2711) Prague 2019}) 2... d5 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 3. c4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} e6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 4. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00: 08]} Bb4 {11 Vidit has always loved to play the Ragozin.} 5. Qa4+ {[%emt 0:00: 16]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 6. e3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:17]} 7. Qc2 { [%emt 0:00:05]} Re8 {[%emt 0:00:41]} 8. Bd2 {[%emt 0:00:06]} a6 {[%emt 0:00:18] } 9. a3 {[%emt 0:00:15]} Bd6 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 10. Rd1 {9 Wesley So tries to attack Vidit on his game that was played against Wojtaszek in March 2019.} Bd7 {1567 Vidit had already played this against Wojtaszek, yet took 26 minutes for the move. What was going through his head?} 11. h3 {99} (11. Bc1 dxc4 12. Bxc4 h6 13. O-O e5 14. dxe5 Nxe5 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 16. Nd5 Bd6 17. b4 Be6 18. g3 Nxd5 19. Bxd5 Bxd5 20. Rxd5 Qe7 $11 {1/2-1/2 (27) Wojtaszek,R (2722)-Vidit,S (2711) Prague 2019}) 11... h6 {827 A useful move in general.} (11... e5 $5 12. cxd5 ( 12. dxe5 Nxe5 13. Nxe5 Rxe5 14. cxd5 c6 $1 $11) 12... exd4 $1 13. dxc6 dxc3 14. Bxc3 Bxc6 $11 15. Ng5 $2 h6 16. Bxf6 Qxf6 17. Qh7+ Kf8 {is absolutely nothing for White.}) 12. c5 {549 Wesley makes quite a provocative choice.} Bf8 { [%emt 0:00:17]} 13. Ne5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Nxe5 $1 {[%emt 0:00:26]} 14. dxe5 { [%emt 0:00:06]} Ne4 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 15. Nxe4 {[%emt 0:00:07]} dxe4 {[%emt 0: 00:05]} 16. Ba5 {66} (16. Qxe4 Bc6 17. Qc2 Qg5 $44) 16... Qc8 $1 {259 Vidit now extricates himself from this slightly passive position very nicely.} 17. g4 {198} Bc6 {108} 18. Bg2 {[%emt 0:00:30]} Rd8 $1 {453} 19. Rxd8 {1284} (19. Bxe4 Rxd1+ 20. Kxd1 Qd7+ 21. Ke1 (21. Ke2 Bxe4 22. Qxe4 Qb5+ $19) 21... Bxe4 22. Qxe4 Rd8 $17) 19... Qxd8 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 20. Bxe4 {165} Bxe4 {62} 21. Qxe4 {64 } Bxc5 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 22. Qxb7 {262} Rb8 {[%emt 0:00:34]} 23. Qxc7 {[%emt 0: 00:09]} (23. Qxa6 Qd5 24. O-O Rxb2 $36) 23... Qxc7 {[%emt 0:00:44]} 24. Bxc7 { [%emt 0:00:04]} Rxb2 {627 Black is a pawn down, but White has no real way of clinging on to his extra material.} 25. O-O {172} Rc2 {[%emt 0:00:43]} (25... Bxa3 26. Ra1 Be7 $1 {Perhaps Vidit missed this.} 27. Rxa6 Bh4 28. f4 Bf2+ 29. Kg2 Bxe3+ 30. Kf3 Rb3 $11) 26. Bd6 {190} Bxd6 {[%emt 0:00:13]} 27. exd6 { [%emt 0:00:04]} Rd2 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 28. Rb1 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Rxd6 {[%emt 0:00: 07]} 29. Rb8+ {[%emt 0:00:04]} Kh7 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 30. Rb7 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Kg6 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 31. Ra7 {3 This rook endgame should no doubt be drawn, but it seems a big uncomfortable when your opponent's rook is more active than yours.} Kf6 {[%emt 0:00:28]} (31... f5 $1 {Somehow after looking through the entire game, it seems as if the sooner Black deals with his issue of the kingside pawns, the better it is. Black should be fine here after Kf6 and g5.} 32. Kg2 Kf6 33. Kf3 g5 $11) 32. h4 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Rc6 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 33. Kg2 {85} g5 {500 I somehow felt this was a tension in the position that could not benefit Black because taking on h4 would leave him with a weakness on h6 and if he doesn't take then at all points he has to worry about h4-h5.} 34. Kg3 {[%emt 0:00:36]} gxh4+ {[%emt 0:00:25]} 35. Kxh4 {5 Vidit has no real problems going into this structure, believing in the soundness of his position.} Kg6 { [%emt 0:00:31]} 36. a4 {96} Rc2 {242} (36... f5 $1 {It was time to get active now.} 37. a5 fxg4 38. Kxg4 e5 {Black should be able to easily hold this.}) 37. Kg3 {[%emt 0:00:55]} Rc6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 38. a5 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Kf6 {89} 39. e4 {208} Kg6 {221} 40. f3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Kf6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 41. Kf4 {171} e5+ {630} 42. Kg3 {67} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:36]} 43. Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:23]} Kh7 { [%emt 0:00:17]} 44. Rd8 {130} Kg7 {108} 45. Ra8 {178} Kh7 {118} 46. Kf2 {450} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:45]} 47. Kg2 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Rc2+ {108} 48. Kg3 {[%emt 0:00: 16]} Rc6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 49. Ra7 {[%emt 0:00:12]} Kf8 {163} 50. Kf2 {144} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:58]} 51. Kg2 {[%emt 0:00:43]} Rc2+ {[%emt 0:00:43]} 52. Kg3 { [%emt 0:00:06]} Rc6 {121} 53. Rd7 {[%emt 0:00:14]} Kf8 $6 {876} (53... Rc5 $1 { Now it is not so easy to calculate the pawn endgame after this, but after thorough analysis, one can conclude that this is a draw.} 54. Rd5 Rxd5 55. exd5 Kf8 56. f4 (56. Kh4 Ke7 57. Kh5 Kd6 58. Kxh6 Kxd5 59. Kg7 Ke6 60. Kf8 (60. g5 Kf5 $11) 60... Kf6 61. Ke8 Ke6 $11) 56... f6 (56... exf4+ 57. Kxf4 Ke7 58. Ke5 $18) 57. fxe5 fxe5 58. Kf3 Ke7 59. Ke3 Kd7 $11) 54. Rd5 {124} Re6 {[%emt 0:00: 06]} 55. Rc5 {130} Ke8 $6 {247} (55... Kg7 {The king should be kept on the kingside.} 56. Kh4 Kh7 57. g5 (57. Kh5 Rf6 (57... Kg7 58. g5 hxg5 59. Kxg5 $18) 58. Rxe5 Rxf3 $11) 57... Kg6 $11) 56. Kh4 {449} Kf8 {[%emt 0:00:37]} 57. Kh5 { 573} Kg7 {272} (57... Rf6 58. Rxe5 Rxf3 59. Kxh6 $16) 58. g5 $1 {167 White gets this just in time before Black could play Rf6.} hxg5 {[%emt 0:00:56]} 59. Kxg5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rh6 {117} (59... Rf6 60. Kg4 Re6 61. Kf5 Rf6+ 62. Kxe5 Rxf3 63. Rc6 {is similar to the game.}) 60. Kf5 {[%emt 0:00:54]} Rf6+ {[%emt 0: 00:49]} 61. Kxe5 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Rxf3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 62. Rc6 {[%emt 0:00:16] } Rh3 {61} 63. Kd5 {165} Rd3+ {98} 64. Kc5 {82} Re3 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 65. Kd4 { 239} Ra3 {[%emt 0:00:30]} 66. Rxa6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Ra1 {180} 67. e5 $1 { 496 White could have already started his journey towards the queenside. Why did he push his pawn to e5 before that? The pawn cramps black a little more.} ( 67. Kc5 Re1 68. Rc6 Rxe4 69. a6 Ra4 70. Kb5 Ra1 71. Kb6 $18) 67... Rd1+ {67} 68. Kc5 {[%emt 0:00:10]} Rc1+ {96} 69. Kd5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rd1+ {[%emt 0:00: 15]} 70. Kc6 {110} Re1 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 71. Rb6 {440} Rxe5 {[%emt 0:00:15]} 72. a6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Re7 {92} (72... Ra5 73. Kb7 f6 74. a7 Rxa7+ 75. Kxa7 Kg6 76. Ka6 Kg5 77. Kb5 f5 78. Kc4 $18) 73. Rb7 {196} Re6+ {[%emt 0:00:21]} 74. Kb5 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Re5+ {[%emt 0:00:37]} 75. Kb6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Re6+ {[%emt 0: 00:39]} 76. Ka5 {360} Re5+ {[%emt 0:00:27]} 77. Rb5 {66} Re7 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 78. Rc5 $1 {59 Nice move by Wesley. The threat now is to get the king to b6 followed by the rook blocking the checks along the c-file.} Kg6 {117} 79. Kb6 { [%emt 0:00:04]} f5 {[%emt 0:00:24]} 80. a7 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Re8 {[%emt 0:00:33] } 81. Kb7 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Kg5 {[%emt 0:00:18]} 82. Rc8 {[%emt 0:00:02]} (82. a8=Q Rxa8 83. Kxa8 Kg4 84. Kb7 f4 85. Kc6 f3 $11) 82... Re7+ {[%emt 0:00:08]} 83. Kb8 {[%emt 0:00:24]} Rxa7 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 84. Kxa7 {1 It's quite amazing that White is just in time by one tempo!} Kf4 {[%emt 0:00:41]} (84... f4 85. Kb6 f3 86. Kc5 Kg4 87. Kd4 f2 88. Rf8 Kg3 89. Ke3 $18) 85. Kb6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Ke3 {[%emt 0:00:42]} 86. Re8+ {[%emt 0:00:03]} Kd3 {68} 87. Rf8 {[%emt 0:00:04] } Ke4 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 88. Kc5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} f4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 89. Kc4 { [%emt 0:00:01]} Ke3 {62} 90. Kc3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} f3 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 91. Re8+ {[%emt 0:00:03]} Kf2 {[%emt 0:00:18]} 92. Kd2 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Kf1 {[%emt 0:00: 59]} 93. Ke3 {27 One could say that Vidit didn't play the endgame well. But also due credit should be given to Wesley So. To beat a player of Vidit's calibre in such an equalish endgame is not easy.} 1-0 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Ding, Liren"] [Black "Firouzja, Alireza"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E06"] [WhiteElo "2811"] [BlackElo "2702"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. a4 Nc6 9. Qxc4 Na5 (9... Qd5 10. Nbd2 Rd8 11. e3 Qh5 12. Ne1 e5 13. dxe5 Ng4 14. Ndf3 Be6 15. Qc2 Bf5 16. Qb3 Be4 {Mareco,S (2606)-Zhigalko,A (2591) Baku 2016}) 10. Qc2 b6 11. Ne5 Bb7 {N} (11... Nd5 12. Bd2 Bb7 13. Na3 Re8 14. Nd3 Nc6 15. Qc4 Rb8 16. Rfd1 b5 17. axb5 Nb6 18. Qa2 Nxd4 19. Nf4 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 Nxb5 { Chloupek,S (2310)-Adamek,Z (2120) Prague 1994}) 12. Bxb7 Nxb7 13. Nc6 Qe8 14. Rd1 Bc5 15. Ne5 Bd6 16. Nc3 c5 17. Ne4 (17. Nc4 $5) (17. Bg5 $5) 17... Nxe4 18. Qxe4 cxd4 19. Nc4 Nc5 20. Nxd6 Nxe4 21. Nxe8 Rfxe8 22. Rxd4 Nf6 23. Be3 (23. Rd6 $5) 23... Rec8 (23... Nd5 $5 24. Bd2 f5) 24. Rd6 Rc2 25. Rc1 Rxb2 26. Rxb6 Rxb6 27. Bxb6 h6 28. a5 (28. Bd4 $5 Nd5 (28... Kf8 29. Bxf6 gxf6 30. a5 f5 31. Rc6 {is unpleasant}) 29. e4 Nb4 30. Bb6 $5) 28... Nd5 29. Rc6 Ne7 30. Rd6 Rc8 31. e4 Rc1+ 32. Kg2 Nc6 33. Kf3 Kf8 34. Ke2 1/2-1/2 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Safarli, Eltaj"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A04"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2593"] [PlyCount "41"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. Nf3 f5 2. d3 Nc6 (2... Nf6 3. e4 d6 4. exf5 Bxf5 5. d4 Qd7 6. a3 e5 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. Bg5 Be7 9. dxe5 Nxe5 10. Nxe5 Qe6 11. Qe2 dxe5 {Grischuk,A (2766) -Mamedyarov,S (2765) Paris 2019}) 3. d4 e6 4. g3 Nf6 5. Bg2 g6 6. c4 Bg7 7. d5 exd5 8. cxd5 Ne7 9. Nc3 c6 {N} (9... d6 10. O-O c5 11. dxc6 bxc6 12. Bf4 d5 13. Rc1 O-O 14. Na4 Ne4 {Studnicka,T (2377)-Golcman,E (2181) Prague 2014}) 10. d6 Ned5 11. Nxd5 Nxd5 12. O-O Qf6 13. Ng5 h6 (13... Qxd6 14. e4 fxe4 15. Nxe4 { is too dangerous.}) 14. Bxd5 cxd5 15. Nf3 Qxd6 16. Bf4 Qe6 17. Nd4 Qb6 18. Nf3 ({On another day Mamedyarov would have played on with} 18. Be3 {when} Qxb2 { is asking for trouble:} 19. Qd3) 18... Qe6 19. Nd4 Qb6 20. Nf3 Qe6 21. Nd4 1/2-1/2 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C17"] [WhiteElo "2729"] [BlackElo "2656"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Ba5 6. b4 cxd4 7. Nb5 ({The sharper and perhaps more challenging alternative is} 7. Qg4) 7... Bc7 8. f4 Bd7 9. Nxc7+ Qxc7 10. Bd3 (10. Nf3 Ba4 11. Bd3 Ne7 12. O-O Nbc6 {transposes.}) 10... Ba4 11. Bb2 Ne7 12. Nf3 Nbc6 13. Qd2 (13. b5 Na5 14. Rb1 a6 15. bxa6 bxa6 16. Nxd4 Nac6 {Anand,V (2767)-So,W (2754) Stavanger 2019}) 13... a6 14. O-O Qb6 15. Qf2 Bb5 16. Bxd4 Nxd4 17. Qxd4 Qxd4+ 18. Nxd4 Bxd3 19. cxd3 Rc8 20. Rac1 {N } (20. Kf2 g6 21. Rfc1 Kd7 22. Ke2 h5 23. g3 Rhg8 24. Kd2 Rxc1 25. Rxc1 Rc8 26. Ra1 Nc6 27. Nf3 Na7 {Sarana,A (2411)-Bivol,A (2208) St Petersburg 2014}) 20... Kd7 21. Kf2 Rxc1 22. Rxc1 Rc8 23. Rxc8 Nxc8 24. Ke3 Ne7 25. a4 Nc6 26. Nxc6 Kxc6 27. d4 b5 28. a5 Kd7 29. g4 Ke7 30. h4 g6 31. h5 1/2-1/2 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk FIDE World Cup"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "20.6"] [White "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2716"] [BlackElo "2758"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. e4 {A surprise. Matlakov is mainly a 1.d4 player. He rarely pushes his king's pawn this early.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O d5 {Aronian likes this move against the Ruy Lopes as well.} 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. Re1 Bg4 9. Nbd2 Nb6 10. h3 Bh5 11. Bb3 Kh8 {A question of style. Aronian likes initiative and therefore prefers to keep queens on the board.} ({White does not seem to have much after:} 11... Qxd3 12. Nxe5 Bxd1 13. Nxd3 Bxb3 14. axb3 Be7 15. b4 a6 16. Ne4 Nd7 17. Bf4 Rac8 18. Rad1 Rfd8 {but eventually managed to win in Giri,A (2797)-Harikrishna,P (2723) Shenzhen 2019. Moreover, these positions would be completely risk-free for White with close to zero chances of a loss.}) 12. Ne4 Be7 13. Ng3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 f5 15. a4 {N} (15. Bc2 a5 16. Nf1 Bg5 17. Qh5 Bxc1 18. Raxc1 Qf6 19. Nh2 g6 20. Qh6 Nd8 {was OK for Black in Dastan,B (2569)-Martirosyan,H (2597) Batumi 2018}) ({The immediate pawn sacrifice} 15. d4 {is also interesting as the line} exd4 16. Nh5 dxc3 17. Qg3 Bf6 18. bxc3 {promises White plenty of initiative on the open files and diagonals.}) 15... a5 {The pawn should not be let run all the way to a6. This will weaken the light squares too much.} 16. d4 f4 ({Once more} 16... exd4 17. Nh5 dxc3 ({But maybe Black can defend with} 17... Bf6) 18. Qg3 Bf6 19. bxc3 { looks good for White.}) 17. Nh5 {Risky, but good.} (17. Ne2 {is more solid.}) 17... g6 18. dxe5 {Except that the follow-up is not the optimal one.} ({ Better was to keep the open file for the rook with} 18. d5 $1 Na7 (18... Nb8 { barely changes much.}) 19. Rxe5 Bd6 ({Worse is} 19... gxh5 20. Rxh5 Qd7 21. Bc2 Rf7 22. c4 {with an overwhelming initiative for White.}) 20. Re6 gxh5 21. Qxh5 {The rook on e6 would have been quite useful on the kingside, whereas the black knights need time to rescue their king.}) 18... gxh5 19. Qxh5 Qd3 { This blocks the bishop's diagonal and prepares a counterattack.} 20. Bf7 Rxf7 { At the first possible moment. Aronian never hesitates whenever the word initiative is on the board.} ({Strictly speaking, he could have waited for a better moment to sacrifice the exchange. After} 20... Rad8 21. Bxf4 $2 { would allow such a chance:} ({Black is doing great after} 21. e6 Nd5 {followed by Nd5-f6 too.}) 21... Rxf7 22. Qxf7 Rf8 {winning.}) 21. Qxf7 Rf8 22. Qh5 Bc5 23. Qf3 {The best defense.} ({Otherwise White will be forced to trade the queens under less favorable circumstances:} 23. Qe2 Qg3 24. Qf3 Nc4 25. e6 N4e5 ) 23... Qxf3 24. gxf3 Rf5 {The minor pieces are better in the arising endgame as they have nice outposts around the white king.} 25. Re4 (25. e6 Kg7 { would not change anything. The e-pawn is due to evaporate soon.}) 25... Nxe5 26. Bxf4 Bd6 27. Kg2 Nd5 28. Bg3 Ng6 $1 ({Less accurate was} 28... Nxf3 29. Bxd6 cxd6 30. Rd1) 29. Rd1 ({After} 29. Bxd6 cxd6 30. Rd1 Ndf4+ 31. Kf1 d5 { Black is much better in any case.}) 29... Kg7 30. h4 Kf7 31. Rd2 ({Here and on the next move it made sense for White to swap the bishops off:} 31. Bxd6 cxd6 32. Kg3) 31... Nf6 32. Red4 Nf4+ 33. Kh2 ({The black bishop will be superbly placed in case of} 33. Bxf4 Bxf4 34. Rd1 Bd6 {followed by b7-b6.}) 33... Ne6 34. Rc4 Bxg3+ $1 {Concrete and strong, especially in timetrouble.} 35. fxg3 ( 35. Kxg3 c6 {followed by Nf6-d5 would also keep the white rooks under control.} ) 35... Rxf3 36. Kg2 ({Perhaps White should have trid:} 36. b4 axb4 37. cxb4 Ra3) 36... Re3 37. g4 Ke7 {The final preparation.} 38. Rf2 ({Or else the black knights and rook create mating threats:} 38. g5 Ne4 39. Rd1 Nf4+ 40. Kf1 Re2) 38... Ne4 $1 {A rook is trapped no matter what!} 39. Rf5 ({If} 39. Rc2 Nd6 { anyway.}) ({Both} 39. Rf3 Rxf3 40. Kxf3 Nd2+) ({and} 39. Rf1 Nd2 {can't help either.}) 39... Nd6 0-1 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Xu, Xiangyu"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E10"] [WhiteElo "2759"] [BlackElo "2576"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O O-O 7. b3 Nc6 (7... b6) (7... c5) 8. Bb2 b6 9. Nbd2 Bb7 10. Rc1 Ne7 (10... Qe7 11. a3 Ne4 12. Qc2 Nxd2 13. Qxd2 Na5 14. Qe3 dxc4 15. b4 Nb3 16. Rxc4 Bd5 {Nikolaou,S (2196) -Delithanasis,D (2007) Nikaia 2017}) 11. Qc2 Rc8 12. Rfd1 {N} (12. Ne5 c5 13. e3 Nd7 14. Rfd1 Qc7 15. Nxd7 Qxd7 16. dxc5 Rxc5 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Qb2+ f6 19. cxd5 Rxc1 20. Rxc1 Nxd5 {1/2 Malyuga,V (2160)-Okrugin,A (2035) Zelenograd 2013} ) 12... Re8 13. Ne5 Nd7 14. Nd3 Nf6 15. Ne5 h5 {The problem for Xu was that he needed to play for a win.} 16. e4 dxe4 17. Nxe4 Nxe4 18. Bxe4 Bxe4 19. Qxe4 c6 (19... Nf5) 20. Qf3 Bxe5 21. dxe5 Qc7 22. h3 Rcd8 23. Qf6 Nc8 24. Rd6 $1 Qe7 25. Qxe7 Nxe7 26. Rcd1 Rb8 27. Bc1 c5 28. Bg5 Rb7 29. g4 Rc7 30. Rd8 Rxd8 31. Rxd8+ Kh7 32. Bf6 Ng8 33. g5 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Black "Alekseenko, Kirill"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C84"] [WhiteElo "2746"] [BlackElo "2671"] [PlyCount "104"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. a4 Bd7 9. c3 Na5 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Qb8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bh4 Be6 14. Nbd2 (14. h3 O-O 15. Bg3 Nh5 16. Bh2 Nf4 17. Bxf4 exf4 18. Re1 bxa4 19. Rxa4 Nc4 20. Rxc4 Bxc4 21. b3 Bb5 {Durarbayli,V (2637)-Inarkiev,E (2693) Konya 2019}) 14... O-O 15. h3 cxd4 16. cxd4 Qb6 {N} (16... Re8 17. Bg3 Qb6 18. dxe5 dxe5 19. axb5 axb5 20. Bxe5 Rad8 21. Qb1 Nc6 22. Bh2 Nb4 {Dragnev,V (2461)-Ragger,M (2644) Czech Republic 2018}) 17. b4 Nc4 18. d5 Bd7 19. Nxc4 bxc4 20. Rb1 a5 21. b5 Rac8 22. Re1 c3 23. Qd3 Rc7 24. Red1 Bd8 25. Bg3 Nh5 26. Nxe5 $5 dxe5 27. Bxe5 Rc8 28. d6 ({Hari must have looked at} 28. g4 {but perhaps he didn't like} Qg6 { but here} 29. Bh2 $1 {is interesting as it prepares a nice way of getting rid of the pin along the g-file with 30.e5! when} Bb6 30. e5 {has to be met with} Rc4 $1 {and there} 31. e6 {leads to wild complications.} (31. Qxc4 $2 Qxc2)) 28... Qc5 29. Bd4 Qxd6 30. b6 Bc6 31. b7 Rb8 32. e5 Qg6 33. Qxg6 fxg6 34. Bc5 Bc7 35. Bxf8 (35. Bb3+ $5) 35... Kxf8 36. Rd4 Bxe5 37. Rc4 Bxb7 38. Rc5 Bd6 39. Rcb5 Bb4 40. Bxg6 Nf6 41. Rd1 Ke7 42. Re5+ Kf8 43. Rb5 Ne8 44. Bc2 Nd6 45. Rxb4 axb4 46. Rxd6 Ba8 47. Bb3 Be4 48. Rd4 Bg6 49. a5 c2 50. Rf4+ Ke7 51. Rc4 Bd3 52. Rc6 Be4 0-1 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Black "Alekseenko, Kirill"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C84"] [WhiteElo "2746"] [BlackElo "2671"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "104"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. e4 {0 ChessBase} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 {0 When in a must-win situation go for the Ruy Lopez!} a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 {2 Hari prefers to go for the d3 line where he feels he can have much better fighting chances for an advantage than Re1.} b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. a4 Bd7 {70} 9. c3 Na5 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Qb8 {70} 12. Bg5 h6 {86} 13. Bh4 Be6 {65} 14. Nbd2 O-O (14... bxa4 15. Bxa4+ $16) 15. h3 cxd4 {18 This has been seen before in Dragnev vs Ragger. Ragger being the former second of Hari, we can be sure that Harikrishna would have looked at this game.} 16. cxd4 Qb6 17. b4 {726 Hari has the first long think of the game for 12 minutes.} (17. axb5 axb5 18. dxe5 dxe5 19. Nxe5 Rac8 { Black has excellently placed pieces which give him enough compensation for the missing pawn.}) 17... Nc4 {176} 18. d5 {66 The nice thing about this position is that it is imbalanced. And this is precisely what Harikrishna needs when he is playing for a win. It doesn't matter that the evaluation is around equal. The fact that the pawn structure is imbalanced gives White chances to make his opponent go wrong.} Bd7 {1062} 19. Nxc4 {81} bxc4 20. Rb1 {69} a5 {200 I do not like this move very much. It gives White a passed pawn and this is a long term trump for Hari. But Alekseenko felt that it was not a big deal. He also gets a fixed square on c5 for his pieces.} (20... Rfc8 {Black looks completely fine and solid.}) 21. b5 {374} Rac8 {404} 22. Re1 {202} c3 {616} 23. Qd3 { 333 The main question in this position will revolve around the fact now whether the c3 pawn is a weakness of a strength. If White can round it up with Rb3 then he would be close to winning, but of course Black will do everything in his power to save it, starting with Rc5 and Rc8.} Rc7 {686} 24. Red1 {540} Bd8 {319} 25. Bg3 {431} Nh5 {71} 26. Nxe5 $5 {183 Harikrishna has seen that the piece sacrifice is promising and goes for it!} (26. Bh2 f5 $17) 26... dxe5 {309} (26... Nxg3 27. Nxd7 $18) 27. Bxe5 $44 {What is the real assessment of this position?} Rc8 {The second best move in the position.} ({An illustrative line as to how complex the position is:} 27... Qg6 28. Bh2 Bc8 29. g4 Nf6 30. Bg3 h5 31. b6 Rb7 32. Qxc3 Bxb6 33. e5 Ne4 34. Qc4 Bxg4 35. hxg4 Bxf2+ 36. Kg2 Rxb1 37. Bxe4 Qxg4 38. Bh7+ Kxh7 39. Qxg4 hxg4 40. Rxb1 Be3 41. Re1 Bg5 42. Re4 f5 43. exf6 Bxf6 44. Bc7 Rf7 45. d6 Kg6 46. Rxg4+ Kf5 47. Rc4 Rd7 48. Rc5+ Ke4 49. Rxa5 Be5 50. Kf2 Bxd6 51. Bxd6 Rxd6 52. Ra8 Rf6+ 53. Ke2 Rf7 54. a5 Kd5 55. a6 Kc5 56. Kd3 Kb6 57. Rb8+ Kxa6 $11) 28. d6 $6 {While cutting off the queen from g6 surely looks strong, better was to begin with g4.} (28. g4 {would have been a stronger choice.} Qg6 (28... Nf6 29. Bd4 Qc7 30. e5 $18) (28... Re8 29. Bh2 Nf6 30. e5 $16) 29. Bh2 Bb6 30. e5 Rc4 $1 {Not at all an easy move to find. } (30... Qxd3 31. Rxd3 $16) 31. Qe2 $1 (31. Qxc4 Qxc2 $17) (31. Qxg6 fxg6 { Opens up the pressure against the f2 pawn.}) 31... Bxg4 32. hxg4 Rxg4+ 33. Kh1 Nf4 (33... Qg5 34. Rg1 $18) 34. Bxg6 Nxe2 35. Re1 (35. Bc2 Nd4 $13) 35... Nd4 36. Be4 $14 {White seems to be doing well here.}) 28... Qc5 $5 {732} (28... Re8 {could have been stronger.} 29. Bd4 Qxd6 (29... Qb7 {looks even stonger, but I doubt is anyone can have the courage to play so calmly.} 30. e5 g6 $19) 30. e5 Qg6 31. Qxg6 fxg6 32. b6 {And this is the point. The b-pawn will ensure that White wins some more pawns and the game would be close to around equal.} (32. Bxg6 c2 $19) 32... Bf5 33. Bxf5 gxf5 34. b7 Rb8 35. Bxc3 Nf4 36. Bd4 Ne2+ 37. Kf1 Nxd4 38. Rxd4 Be7 $15) 29. Bd4 {Harikrishna gives up his d6 pawn as well.} (29. Bh2 Bg5 30. e5 g6 $17) 29... Qxd6 {74} 30. b6 $1 {6 Hari is pushing his b-pawn and trying to create threats all across the board. This is really not an easy position to assess. Mainly because White has only one pawn for his piece. But the black pieces are not so well placed. The knight on h5 is out of the game. e4-e5 is always a threat. This gives White excellent compensation. Kudos to Hari for understanding this. It definitely wasn't easy. Any lesser player would have gone wrong here from Black. But Alekseenko was playing the best chess of his life and managed to hold on.} (30. e5 Qg6 31. Qxg6 fxg6 $13) 30... Bc6 $1 {Accurate move.} (30... Nf4 31. Qf3 $18) 31. b7 Rb8 32. e5 Qg6 33. Qxg6 fxg6 34. Bc5 Bc7 {We reach another critical position in the game. Hari simply took on f8. But perhaps inserting a check would have done him more benefit than harm.} 35. Bxf8 $6 (35. Bb3+ $1 {It was important to give this check.} Kh7 36. Bxf8 Rxf8 37. e6 {White defends his e-pawn.} Nf4 (37... Bxb7 38. e7 Re8 39. Rd7 $18) (37... Rb8 38. Bc2 Nf6 {White is not worse here. In fact he is pushing for something.}) 38. e7 Ne2+ 39. Kf1 Ng3+ 40. Ke1 Re8 41. fxg3 Rxe7+ 42. Kf1 $18) 35... Kxf8 {Now Black is able to organize himself much better.} 36. Rd4 (36. e6 Ke7 {The king joins in.}) 36... Bxe5 37. Rc4 Bxb7 38. Rc5 {Here it seems to me that Harikrishna missed Black's defensive idea.} Bd6 $1 {The bishop can now come to b4.} 39. Rcb5 (39. Rxa5 Nf4 $1 40. Rab5 Ne2+ 41. Kf1 Nd4 42. Rxb7 Rxb7 43. Rxb7 Nxc2 $19) 39... Bb4 $19 {With this move Hari's chances of equalizing the score were dashed.} 40. Bxg6 Nf6 41. Rd1 Ke7 42. Re5+ Kf8 43. Rb5 Ne8 44. Bc2 Nd6 45. Rxb4 axb4 46. Rxd6 Ba8 47. Bb3 Be4 48. Rd4 Bg6 49. a5 c2 50. Rf4+ Ke7 51. Rc4 Bd3 52. Rc6 Be4 {The rook is dominated on the c-file. Harikrishna tried his best but Alekseenko played really well.} 0-1 [Event "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"] [Date "2019.09.17"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2718"] [BlackElo "2767"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "89"] [EventDate "2019.09.07"] [EventType "k.o."] [EventCountry "RUS"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. c4 {0 0 Vidit chooses 1.c4 in this must win game.} e5 {23 23 Wesley has always stuck to this move.} 2. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:52]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 3. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:10]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 4. g3 {[%emt 0:00:13]} d5 {[%emt 0:00:07] } 5. cxd5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 6. Bg2 {10 10 We have the reversed Dragon.} Bc5 $5 {5 5 This move is quickly overtaking ...Nb6 in terms of popularity.} 7. O-O {[%emt 0:00:35]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:06]} 8. d3 {[%emt 0:00: 24]} Re8 {3 3 This is not the most popular move in the position but already players like Caruana, Mamedyarov, Adams, etc have played it with Black.} 9. Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:47]} ({Carlsen in his World Championship Match Game 9 against Caruana went for this.} 9. Bg5 Nxc3 10. bxc3 f6 11. Bc1 Be6 12. Bb2 Bb6 13. d4 Bd5 14. Qc2 exd4 15. cxd4 Be4 16. Qb3+ Bd5 17. Qd1 Bxf3 18. Qb3+ Kh8 19. Bxf3 Nxd4 20. Bxd4 Qxd4 21. e3 Qe5 22. Bxb7 Rad8 23. Rad1 Qe7 24. h4 $14 {With a pleasant position that later ended in a draw. ½-½ (56) Carlsen,M (2835) -Caruana,F (2832) London 2018}) (9. Bd2 Nxc3 10. Bxc3 Nd4 11. b4 Bd6 12. Rb1 Nxf3+ 13. Bxf3 a6 14. a4 c6 {This was game 4 of the match and it was similar to what Vidit has against So. ½-½ (34) Carlsen,M (2835)-Caruana,F (2832) London 2018}) 9... Qxd5 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 10. Bd2 {8 8 This is already a fresh position theoretically, but the contours of it are similar to positions that are reached in this line.} Qd8 {205 205} 11. Rc1 {182 182} Bb6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 12. b4 {[%emt 0:00:52]} Nd4 {6 6 This is the way in which Black would like to equalize. Once you do not have knights on the board, it is much more difficult to create play.} 13. a4 {212 212} a6 {[%emt 0:00:36]} 14. Bc3 {234 234} Nxf3+ { 535 535} 15. Bxf3 {[%emt 0:00:33]} c6 {4 4 Black says I am trying to be as solid as you can. The ball is in White's court. The onus is on Vidit who is in a must win situation to do something here.} 16. b5 {639 639} cxb5 {[%emt 0:00: 58]} 17. axb5 {6 6 Both moves - taking on b5 or playing a5 look fine for Black. Somehow one gets a feeling that Vidit played the opening in a little too simplified manner. It's definitely difficult to beat a player of Wesley's class from such a position.} axb5 {410 410} 18. Qb3 {109 109} Bd7 {63 63} 19. Bxb7 {91 91} Rb8 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 20. Be4 {857 857} Qf6 {347 347} 21. e3 { 433 433} Bf5 {416 416 Wesley is trying to be as solid as possible in the position. Of course exchanging the bishops with Bxf5 is possible, but Vidit could also go Bd5, keeping the tension in the position.} 22. Bb4 $5 {593 593 Vidit is not worried about the fact that he would be crippling his pawn structure. In fact he is looking at the d5 outpost for this rook in the future. } (22. Bd5 Bxd3 23. Bxe5 Qxe5 24. Qxd3 Red8 25. Rfd1 $16) 22... Bxe4 {306 306} 23. dxe4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} h5 $1 {5 5 Wesley understands the most important thing about the position after the bishops have been exchanged. He can try to take advantage of the weakened light squares around the white king.} 24. Qd1 { 547 547} Qg6 {539 539} 25. Qf3 {[%emt 0:00:23]} Bd8 $1 {39 39 Wesley reroutes his bishop to e7 where he can exchange it for the strong b4 bishop.} 26. Rfd1 { [%emt 0:00:51]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00:42]} 27. Rb1 {108 108} Bxb4 {444 444} 28. Rxb4 {[%emt 0:00:27]} Qg4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 29. Kg2 {138 138} f6 {333 333} 30. Rd5 { 345 345} Qxf3+ {113 113} 31. Kxf3 {[%emt 0:00:02]} g5 {0 0 Wesley is happy if White takes the b5 pawn and a pair of rooks are exchanged. The resulting four vs five endgame is a draw.} 32. Ke2 {1076} Rec8 {[%emt 0:00:31]} 33. f4 {335} exf4 {480} 34. gxf4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} gxf4 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 35. Rxh5 {[%emt 0: 00:47]} fxe3 {[%emt 0:00:49]} 36. Kxe3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Kf7 {71} 37. h4 {107} Rh8 {[%emt 0:00:19]} 38. Rbxb5 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Rxb5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 39. Rxh8 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 40. Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Rh5 {[%emt 0:00: 00]} 41. Ra7+ {[%emt 0:00:49]} Kg6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 42. Ra6 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 43. Ra7+ {[%emt 0:00:11]} Kg6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 44. Ra6 { [%emt 0:00:03]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 45. Ra7+ {[%emt 0:00:05] With this draw, the match ends in 1.5-0.5 victory for Wesley So and Vidit is eliminated.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2019.09.20"] [Round "28.2"] [White "Duda, Jan-Krzysztof"] [Black "Xiong, Jeffery"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A34"] [WhiteElo "2730"] [BlackElo "2707"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2019.??.??"] [SourceVersionDate "2014.12.06"] 1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nc7 7. O-O g6 ({ Duda expected a more "central" line:} 7... e5 8. a3 Be7 9. Rb1 O-O 10. b4 cxb4 11. axb4 b5) 8. Na4 ({White did not get anything in the following Women Speed Chess Championship game:} 8. d3 Bg7 9. Be3 Ne6 10. Rc1 O-O 11. Qd2 Rb8 12. Bh6 b6 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. Ng5 Nxg5 15. Qxg5 Bb7 16. Rfd1 e5 17. Qxd8 Rfxd8 {Harika, D (2492) -Sebag,M (2476) chess.com INT 2019}) 8... Ne6 ({Otherwise there might be problems along the diagonals:} 8... b6 9. d4 (9. e3) 9... cxd4 10. Bf4 { (Duda)}) 9. d3 Ncd4 10. Be3 {"I am winning a pawn and this cannot be bad, right?" (Duda)} ({White was also considering} 10. Nxd4 cxd4 11. b4 {"It is very pleasant for White." (Duda)}) 10... Bg7 11. Rc1 O-O $1 {N A novelty and the best move under the circumstances. Xiong spotted non-obvious counterplay.} ({A predecessor saw Black burning down in flames after} 11... Qd6 12. Nd2 f5 13. Nb3 Nxb3 14. Qxb3 Nd4 15. Bxd4 cxd4 16. Nc5 Qb6 17. Qa4+ Kf7 18. Bd5+ e6 19. Bxb7 {1-0 (19) Endzelins,L-Nikkanen,P Finland 1977}) 12. Nxc5 Nf5 13. Nxe6 ({From the theoretical point of view, this move is not optimal. After the accurate} 13. Bd2 $1 Nxc5 14. Rxc5 Bxb2 15. Qb3 Bg7 16. Rfc1 {"White is a little better" (Duda)}) 13... Bxe6 14. Bc5 ({Otherwise Black will get enough counterplay thanks to his strong dark-squared bishop:} 14. b3 Nxe3 15. fxe3 Qb6 ) 14... Bxb2 15. Rb1 Bg7 16. Rxb7 {"I decided to sacrifice the exchange." (Duda)} Qc8 $1 17. Rb5 a6 18. Ra5 {Now the rook is stuck on a5 and in order to free it White needs to sacrifice some material.} Bc3 19. Qa4 ({Another way to sacrifice the exchange was:} 19. Bb6 Bxa5 20. Bxa5 Rb8) 19... Rb8 $1 {Duda said he had forgotten about this move, and that it threatens 20...Bd7 21.Qa3 Bb2 winning the queen.} ({It's better than} 19... Bxa5 20. Qxa5 Rb8 21. Qa3 { which is a much better version of the sacrifice that White got into the game.}) 20. d4 $1 {There is nothing else.} ({The point behind Xiong's idea is that White can not free himself with:} 20. Rc1 $2 {due to:} Bd7 21. Qa3 Bb2 { when Black wins.}) 20... Bxa5 21. Qxa5 {Black won an exchange, but White has the bishop pair and a solid pawn structure. Xiong's next move is an inaccuracy. } Rb2 {This wins another pawn, but now White's center expands.} ({Instead he should have slowed White down in the center with} 21... Bd5 22. Re1 Rb5 23. Qc3 Nd6) 22. e4 $1 Nd6 23. Qa3 Rxa2 24. Qe3 {"White always has compensation as he can push the central pawns." (Duda)} f6 {The queen sortie to h6 was not yet dangerous.} ({Therefore} 24... Qb7 {deserved serious investigation, e.g.} 25. d5 (25. Ne5 $5) (25. Qh6 f6) 25... Bd7 26. Qh6 f6) 25. Rc1 Qd7 {In the wrong direction!} ({After} 25... Qb7 $1 26. d5 Bd7) ({or} 25... Qb8 $5 {Black would be looking into the future without any fear.}) 26. d5 Bh3 27. Bxh3 Qxh3 { The trade of the bishops looked logical but in reality it weakened the e6 square.} 28. Bxd6 ({Even better was the direct:} 28. Nd4 $1 Rb8 29. Nc6 Rb7 30. Nxe7+ Rxe7 31. Bxd6 {with advantage for White.}) 28... exd6 29. Nd4 Rc8 ({ Duda realized here that Black can defend himself with} 29... Rb8 $1 30. Ne6 Rab2 31. Qa7 R2b7 {followed by Rb7-b1 with counter-chances. If Black can keep the opponent's queen away he would be safe.}) 30. Nc6 Re8 31. Nd4 Rc8 ({After} 31... Qd7 32. Ne6 Rb2 33. Rc7 Rb1+ 34. Kg2 Qb5 {White can still play for a win with} 35. Kh3 $1) 32. Rb1 Ra4 33. Ne6 {The knight on e6 defended by a pawn is as good as a rook, Kasparov would say. Here it is better than any of the black rooks and Xiong's defense is very difficult.} Rac4 34. Re1 g5 {Now comes the fantastic:} ({Duda felt that Black should be already losing anyway. However:} 34... a5 $1 35. Qa7 Qh6 36. Qxa5 (36. Kg2 a4) 36... Rc1 $1 {with the same old idea of trading the rooks and keeping White busy might have saved Black.}) 35. e5 $3 {A breakthrough into Black's most defended square after which his position falls apart.} dxe5 ({Nothing helps:} 35... Qf5 36. exd6 Qxd5 37. Qa7 { (Duda)}) 36. Qa7 Qh6 37. d6 Rc1 38. Rxc1 Rxc1+ 39. Kg2 g4 {Mate is threatened, but it is all under control:} 40. h4 gxh3+ 41. Kh2 Qg6 42. Qa8+ ({From afar White planned:} 42. Qb7 {which also wins, but slowlier.}) ({"The only thing to be aware of is not to get checkmated after:"} 42. Qe7 $4 Rh1+ 43. Kxh1 Qe4+ { (Duda)}) (42. Qa8+ {Black resigned due to:} Kf7 43. d7 {The white queen protects him on the long diagonal.}) 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.20"] [Round "4.1"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C99"] [WhiteElo "2774"] [BlackElo "2729"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d6 9. h3 Na5 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Qc7 12. Nbd2 cxd4 13. cxd4 Nc6 14. Nb3 a5 15. Be3 a4 16. Nbd2 Bd7 17. Rc1 Rac8 (17... Qb7 18. a3 Rfe8 19. Bd3 exd4 20. Nxd4 Ne5 21. Bb1 b4 22. f4 Ng6 23. Qf3 bxa3 24. bxa3 Rac8 {Saric,I (2695)-Akopian,V (2650) St Petersburg 2018}) 18. Bd3 Qb7 19. Qe2 h6 20. a3 {After a 15-minute think (and another 12 minutes on the next) Svidler decides to go or some trades.} exd4 ({He must have been looking at} 20... Rfe8 $5 {as well.}) 21. Nxd4 Nxd4 22. Bxd4 Rxc1 {N} (22... Rfe8 23. Rb1 Bd8 24. b3 Qa6 25. Nf3 Ba5 26. b4 Bd8 27. Rbd1 Qb7 28. Bb2 Be7 29. Nd4 Rb8 {Vertongen,W (2379)-Palmkoeck,W (2334) ICCF email 2004}) 23. Rxc1 b4 {MVL spent 13.5 minutes on this.} (23... Bc6 $5) 24. Nc4 {And here, after a 21-minute think, Svidler decides to sacrifice a pawn as there is nothing better.} (24. axb4) 24... bxa3 25. bxa3 Bb5 26. Nxd6 $1 {The best chance is to take the bait.} Bxd3 27. Qxd3 Bxd6 28. Bxf6 Bf4 29. Rb1 Qc7 30. Bc3 Rd8 31. Qf3 Rc8 $6 ({Much safer was} 31... Bd6 { and it's not easy for White to convert the extra pawn.}) 32. Bb4 {Now White threatens to consolidate with g3, Kg2 and further improve the position.} Qc1+ ( {The computer comes up with the funny idea} 32... Bc1 $5 {locking in the white rook and after e.g.} 33. Be1 {Black can move his bishop to d6 after all:} Bf4 34. g3 Bd6 {with better drawing chances than in the game.}) 33. Qd1 Qc4 34. g3 Qxe4 ({Instead of playing a long and unpleasant game after e.g.} 34... Be5 35. Qd7 Qc2 36. Re1 Qc6 37. Qxc6 Rxc6 38. Rd1 {Svidler tries something concrete, but it doesn't work.}) 35. gxf4 Rc6 36. f5 $1 {Missed by Svidler.} Qxf5 37. Bd6 Qxh3 38. Rb4 Rc3 39. Rd4 Kh7 40. Qxa4 Qf3 41. Qd1 Qc6 42. Qf1 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.20"] [Round "4.1"] [White "Vitiugov, Nikita"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C43"] [WhiteElo "2732"] [BlackElo "2767"] [PlyCount "119"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 Nxe4 4. Bd3 d5 5. Nxe5 Nd7 6. Nc3 Nxe5 7. dxe5 Nxc3 8. bxc3 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. f4 f5 11. Be3 (11. exf6 Bxf6 12. Ba3 Rf7 13. Re1 Bxc3 14. Bxh7+ Kxh7 15. Qd3+ Bf5 16. Qxc3 d4 17. Qb3 Qf6 {Arribas Lopez,A (2511)-Dragun,K (2614) chess.com INT 2017}) 11... Be6 12. a4 Qd7 13. Qf3 Rfd8 { N} (13... b6 14. Rfd1 Rfd8 15. h3 c6 16. c4 Bc5 17. Bxc5 bxc5 18. Be2 Rab8 19. Qa3 Qe7 {Moll,R (2642)-Stalmach,K (2562) ICCF email 2012}) 14. Rfd1 c5 15. Kh1 g6 16. h3 Qc7 17. Qf2 b6 18. Qe1 Kh8 19. Be2 Rg8 20. Bf3 Rad8 21. a5 b5 22. a6 $1 Rd7 23. Rdb1 Rb8 24. Bf2 Rdd8 25. Qe2 Qb6 26. Rb2 Rd7 27. Qf1 Rc7 28. Be2 Bd7 29. Qd1 Qe6 30. Ra5 Kg7 31. Qa1 g5 32. Bxb5 Rxb5 33. Raxb5 Bxb5 34. Rxb5 gxf4 35. Qa5 $1 {It all works perfectly for White.} Qxe5 $6 ({Black should have waited with} 35... Qc6) 36. Rb7 Rxb7 37. axb7 f3 {This active defense actually leads to a lost position much quicker.} 38. gxf3 Bd6 39. Kg2 Qh2+ 40. Kf1 Qxh3+ 41. Ke2 {Eventually Black will have to give up his bishop for the b-pawn.} Qh2 42. Qxa7 Kf6 43. Qb6 Ke7 44. Qc6 Kd8 45. Qc8+ Ke7 46. Qxf5 Kd8 47. Kf1 Qh1+ 48. Bg1 Bh2 49. Qg4 (49. Qc8+ Ke7 50. Qxc5+ {would have been simpler.} ) 49... Bd6 50. Ke2 Ke7 51. Bxc5 Qh2+ 52. Bf2 ({And here the quickest was} 52. Kd3 $1 Bxc5 53. Qg7+ Kd8 54. Qg8+ Ke7 55. b8=Q) 52... h5 53. Qf5 Kd8 54. Qc8+ Ke7 55. Qf5 Kd8 56. Qf7 h4 57. Qg8+ Kd7 58. Qg4+ Kc6 59. Qc8+ Kb5 60. b8=Q+ 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.20"] [Round "4.1"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Dominguez Perez, Leinier"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A14"] [WhiteElo "2759"] [BlackElo "2763"] [PlyCount "175"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O Be7 5. c4 O-O 6. d4 dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. a4 Bd7 9. Qxc4 Bc6 10. Bg5 Nbd7 11. Nc3 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. Rfd1 (13. b4 Bd5 14. Nxd5 exd5 15. Qb3 c6 16. e3 Bd6 17. Rab1 Qe7 18. Rfd1 g6 {So,W (2776)-Giri,A (2779) Saint Louis 2019}) 13... Bd5 14. Qd3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 c6 16. Kg2 {N} (16. e3 a5 17. Rac1 Nd5 18. Ne4 Qb6 19. Qc2 Nb4 20. Qe2 Qa6 21. Nc5 Bxc5 22. Rxc5 Qxe2 23. Bxe2 Rfd8 {Zhao,J (2601)-Wang,Y (2690) China 2018}) 16... Qa5 17. e3 Rfd8 18. Qc4 Rac8 19. Rab1 Nd5 20. Qb3 Qb4 21. Qc2 a5 22. h4 Nf6 23. h5 Rc7 24. Ne2 Qb6 25. Nf4 Nd5 26. Rbc1 Bd6 27. Nd3 Nb4 28. Qb3 Rcd7 29. Be4 Qc7 30. Rh1 Nxd3 31. Bxd3 Be7 32. Bb1 Qd6 33. Qc2 Bf6 34. Qc5 Qxc5 35. Rxc5 Rd5 36. Rc4 e5 37. Be4 R5d7 38. dxe5 Bxe5 39. b4 axb4 40. Rxb4 Ra8 41. Rhb1 Ra7 42. Bf5 Re7 43. Bc8 c5 44. Rb5 Rc7 45. Bxb7 Rxa4 46. Bd5 Kf8 47. f4 Bc3 48. e4 Bd4 49. e5 c4 50. Rb8+ Ke7 51. R1b7 Ra7 52. Bc6 f5 53. Rxc7+ Rxc7 54. Ba4 Ra7 55. Rb4 Rc7 56. Kf3 Ke6 57. Bc2 Ba7 58. Ra4 Bb6 59. Ke2 Kd5 60. Bxf5 Ra7 61. Rxa7 Bxa7 62. Kf3 Bc5 63. Bh7 c3 64. Kg4 Bf2 65. Bg8+ Kc6 66. Bb3 Kd7 67. Kf3 Be1 68. g4 Bd2 69. Ke4 Ke7 70. Kf5 Be3 71. g5 hxg5 72. Kxg5 Bd2 73. Kg4 Be3 74. Kf3 Bd2 75. h6 gxh6 76. f5 c2 $2 (76... Kf8 {holds. After} 77. f6 Bc1 78. Ke4 h5 {Black's two passers defend against White's wining attempts.} ({After} 78... Bg5 79. Kf5 Bc1 80. e6 {the only way is the brilliant} Ba3 81. Kg6 Be7 $3 {and White cannot win anymore! Just wow.} ({The winning method after} 81... Bb4 82. Kxh6 Ba3 {is} 83. Kg6 Bb4 84. Kf5 Ba3 85. Ke5 Bb4 86. Kd5 Ba3 87. Ba4 Bb4 88. Kc6 Ke8 89. Kc7+)) 79. e6) 77. f6+ Kf8 78. Bxc2 Bc3 79. Kf4 h5 80. Bd1 h4 81. Bg4 Ba5 82. Kf5 Bc7 83. e6 Bd8 84. Bh5 h3 85. Bg4 h2 86. Bf3 Kg8 87. Kg6 Kf8 88. Bc6 1-0 [Event "FIDE World Cup 2019"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2019.09.20"] [Round "4.1"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Yu, Yangyi"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B33"] [WhiteElo "2776"] [BlackElo "2763"] [PlyCount "103"] [EventDate "2019.09.10"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bf4 e5 8. Bg5 a6 9. Na3 b5 10. Nd5 Be7 11. Bxf6 Bxf6 12. c4 b4 13. Nc2 O-O (13... a5 14. Qf3 Be6 15. Rd1 Bxd5 16. exd5 Nd4 17. Nxd4 exd4 18. Bd3 Kf8 19. g3 g6 20. h4 h5 {Karjakin,S (2748)-Radjabov,T (2759) Moscow 2019}) 14. g3 Bg5 (14... a5 15. h4 Be6 16. Qd2 Rc8 17. Nce3 Nd4 18. O-O-O g6 19. Kb1 h5 20. f4 Bg7 21. Bd3 f5 { Nepomniachtchi,I (2720)-Yu,Y (2715) Havana 2015}) 15. Bg2 a5 16. O-O Ne7 17. Nce3 Bxe3 18. Nxe3 Be6 19. b3 Ra7 20. Qd3 Nc6 21. Rfd1 {N} (21. f4 f6 22. Kh1 Nd4 23. Nc2 Nxc2 24. Qxc2 Qb6 25. Rad1 Rc8 26. Qd2 Ra6 {Enders,P (2460)-Bobras, P (2531) Germany 2015}) 21... Nd4 22. Nc2 Nxc2 23. Qxc2 a4 24. Rab1 Qb6 25. Rd2 axb3 26. axb3 Rfa8 27. h3 h6 28. Rbd1 Ra1 29. Kh2 Qc5 30. Bf3 f6 31. Rxa1 Rxa1 32. Qd3 Ra6 33. Bg4 Bf7 34. Bd7 Kf8 35. Bb5 Ra3 36. Kg2 Kg8 37. Qf3 Kh8 38. h4 Ra8 39. Qg4 Qc7 40. h5 $6 ({Promising was} 40. Bd7 $1 {e.g.} Ra1 (40... Rd8 41. Be6 Be8 (41... Bxe6 42. Qxe6 {is not possible becuse White will continue 42. Qd5 and 43.c5}) 42. h5 Bc6 43. Bf5 Be8 44. Qd1 Bf7 45. Ra2 {with strong pressure.}) 41. Be6 Be8 (41... Bxe6 42. Qxe6 Ra6 43. Rd5 Kh7 44. h5 Rc6 45. Rb5 Rb6 46. Qe8 Qb7 47. Kg1 $1 Qc7 48. Qa8 $1 {forces a queen trade}) 42. h5 Ra8 ( 42... Ra3 43. Qd1 Ra6 44. Bf5 Bf7 45. c5 $1 Qxc5 46. Rc2) 43. Qd1 Rd8 44. Bf5 Bf7 45. Ra2 {again with strong pressure.}) 40... Kg8 41. Qd1 Rd8 42. Kh2 Be6 43. g4 Kh7 44. Ra2 Qb7 45. f3 Ra8 46. Rxa8 Qxa8 47. Qxd6 Qa2+ 48. Kg3 Qxb3 49. g5 Qe3 50. g6+ Kh8 51. Qxe6 Qg1+ 52. Kh3 1/2-1/2